Cardiovascular Disease Report

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Health
Priorities
In Australia

Part 1
Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) as a preventable chronic disease

Yr 12
Term 4 2012

Table Of Contents

Page 1: 5 recent measures of epidemiology related to CVD

Page 2-3 : Justify the inclusion of Cardiovascular Disease as a priority health issues

Page 4-8: Cardiovascular Disease Report

Page 9: Glossary

Page:12 Bibliography

Page: References

Abbreviations/Key:
CVD – Cardio-vascular Disease
ATSI- Australian and Torres Strait Islanders
Underlined words refer to the glossary on page: 9

Gather 5 recent measures of epidemiology related to CVD

1. CVD remains the most expensive disease group in Australia, costing about $5.9 billion in 2004–05 with just over half of this money spent on patients admitted to hospital.1

2. In 2004-05, people with cardiovascular disease were more likely to live in the most disadvantaged socioeconomic areas than those without cardiovascular diseases (22% compared to 17%) 2

3. Cardiovascular disease made up around one-third (34%) of all deaths in 2007.3

4. In 2004-05, 18% (approximately 3.5 million) of Australians reported having a long term cardiovascular condition.4

5. Between 2002 and 2005, in Queensland, Western Australia, South Australia and the Northern Territory, cardiovascular disease accounted for over one-quarter (27% or just over 1,500) of all ATSI deaths.5

Justify the inclusion of Cardiovascular Disease as a priority health issues which includes additional funding and support by interpreting the information gathered in question 1.

Although Australia is one of the healthiest countries in the world, it still experiences a range of health inequalities. This is because the Australian Government struggles to allocate their limited funds into all of the health areas that need addressing, thus making it important to prioritise. There are a range of issues that need to be considered when determining priority health issues. Not only does the Government have to take into account morbidity (prevalence of condition) and mortality (death rate), but also epidemiological data, social justice principles, cost on the individual and the community, prevention potential and most importantly population groups at risk. An example of such group would be the ATSI population, who endure significant health inequalities with the gap in life expectance being 20 years less than that of a non-indigenous Australia10.

Social justice principles are one of the very important factors that go into identifying a priority health issue. These principles include participation ( in planning and making community health decisions), equity (the allocation of fair and equal resources without discrimination), access (the ability to use and a range of healthcare assistance, fresh food, clean water and education) and rights (the equal opportunity to achieve ideal health). They are implemented to target the disadvantaged low socio-economic groups within our society and strive to ensure equal access to healthcare for all individuals, with no racial or financial prejudice. These principles are currently not being addressed equally for all Australians therefore making the fight against CVD a difficult one. In order for a lower rate of morbidity and mortality from the disease in the future it is obvious that there is still a need for CVD to be identified as a priority health issue until there is equality throughout Australia within the health care system. To do this however, more funding must be allocated. Priority population groups such as the ATSI population, the elderly and people of low socio-economic status are at particularly high risk when it comes to a number of preventable diseases such as CVD. When these groups are identified through the use of epidemiology and social justice principles the Government can implement initiatives and health promotion programs to attempt to lower the rates of morbidity and...
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