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HOMELESS YOUTH TRANSITIONIN INTO ADULTHOOD

DAVID S. GOODE JR.

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY

January 29, 2013

HOMELESS YOUTH TRANSITIONING INTO ADULTHOOD

A Change Project
Submitted to
The Master of Human Services Program
Lincoln University

In Partial Fulfillment
Of the Requirements for the Degree
Master of Human Services

By
David S. Goode Jr.

Abstract
The project was designed to address high increase in homeless youth not transitioning into adulthood successfully. In fall 2011, a review of the literature confirmed the existence of high rates of homeless youth not transitioning into adulthood successfully. The literature attributed the problem to several causal factors of low income jobs, unemployment, and lack of formal education. There has not been a prototype project conducted within the literature. A need assessment survey of the target population and a data extraction tool was used to represent the target population indicated that new program would help in addressing this problem. A change project was designed at the beginning of the semester, and the objectives were to increase the knowledge of basic life skills by 10%. Evaluation findings showed that the new program increased the level of knowledge of basic skills and rate of youth returning to homelessness decreased by 10%.

Table of Contents
Chapter Page Number
I. Introduction 5
II. Review of Literature 7
III. Needs Assessment 19
IV. Project Implementation 38
V. Project Evaluation 44
VI. Institutionalization and Stabilization 51 VII. Integration of Relevant Concepts 52
VIII. References 53
IX. Appendices 59

Chapter I: Introduction
Background of the Problem
Today, experiencing homelessness has nothing to do with a person’s intrinsic worth. Homelessness is a complex social issue with many variables. Unfortunately, for those experiencing homelessness, the impact of the values of the 1640s are still pervasive. In America many still hold to this tenet, that one only needs to pick themselves up by their bootstraps and into the pursuit of the American dream and for those who cannot, they deserve to be destitute for they bring no ‘added value’ to society (Thompson, Bender, Windsor, Cook, & Williams, 2010). Homelessness means not having a home, living in a place not intended for habitation, or unstably housed. Homelessness in the United States is primarily addressed by providing emergency and transitional shelter facilities that do not directly address the cause of homelessness (Culhane & Metraux, 2008). The Industrial Revolution starting in the 1820s-‘30s people began migrating from the farm to the city in search of jobs. Philadelphia and New York had many people walking the streets causing the country’s first pan-handling ordinances. City jails became de facto shelter systems. Poor safety regulation caused a lot of physical disability and death. Those disabled and widows, many with dependent children had no means to provide for themselves and nowhere to turn. The 1850s brought the first documented cases of homeless youth, many of whom were kicked out of their homes because their providers could no longer afford to raise them (Thompson, Bender, Windsor, Cook & Williams, 2010). Systemic issues have been established over time. People living in generational poverty do not have the resources and support to become educated and move out of poverty. Racial divides still occur in the areas of healthcare, education, access to mortgages, access to equal paying jobs among many others (Thompson, Bender, Windsor, Cook & Williams, 2010). There has been an increase in homelessness among African American male and female adolescents in the City of Philadelphia. In doing this research, the purpose was to address homeless youth transitioning into adulthood globally...
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