Cancer Prevention

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This assignment will look specifically at lung cancer as a health issue, both locally within the Hammersmith and Fulham Primary Care Trust (H&FPCT) and nationally. This work will briefly outline the impact and probable causes of lung cancer in the H&FPCT and suggest an initiative and strategic plan to help challenge this issue. From research previously carried out in relation to lung cancer and its causes, this assignment will discuss the difficulties and problems that could arise while trying to implement the suggested proposal. A needs analysis will be considered relating to the evidence based implementation problems of the proposal, which will firstly take into account, current provisions for lung cancer awareness and the effectiveness of these provisions, secondly, what the public view as cancer related health needs, and finally the national and local considerations in relation to health and cancer prevention. These key points will mould the prioritization basis for implementation procedures of the chosen cancer prevention strategy. This assignment will lastly look at the role of the nurse and other health care professionals and the impact that the chosen strategy will have on them and their work.

H&FPCT is a prime example for an area in need of guidance and preventative information about lung cancer. Smoking causes nine out of ten lung cancer cases in the UK, and is the second most common type of cancer (Cancer Research UK: 2007.) In H&FPCT alone one in three people smoke (Annual Public Health Report: 2005.) Forty-seven thousand residents of the H&FPCT are aged 16-29 (National Statistics: 2001) and it can be seen that nationally forty percent of smokers started smoking under the age of sixteen (H&F Public Health Report: 2006.) It could be suggested that this is the main target group for addressing lung cancer awareness and promoting health. Government has identified this problem and recently this year introduced new legislation stating that it is now illegal to sell or buy tobacco products under the age of eighteen. This law was launched on October 1st 2007, and businesses breaking these laws can be fined up to £2500, they can also be fined £1000 for failing to display a sign stating that they do not sell tobacco products to people under the age of eighteen (DirectGov: 2008.)

Smoking nationally and within H&FPCT is prevalent in the un-employed and underprivileged. Nationally in 2003, 30% of men and 20% of women who were classed as in long term unemployment were smokers, a rise of 4% in men and 6% in women from 2001 (National Statistics 2001.) According to H&F District Council (2002) there were 4425 residents that were unemployed and claiming benefits, this seems like a small figure initially with an estimated population of 171.400 residents in 2006 (Wikipedia 2007,) but this statistic only relates to the number of residents who claim benefits, the reality is that the number of individuals in the borough that are homeless vastly outweighs the number of residents claiming benefits. In 2002 alone there were 7389 names on the housing register for H&F borough (H&F District Council 2002.) This proportion of the public as a whole, e.g. the homeless and the unemployed locally and nationally, seem to be the population that the government forgot when implementing there recent smoking campaigns. Government decided to implement new laws making it illegal to smoke in bars, pubs, employment premises and public enclosed spaces, if an individual is claiming benefits or homeless, when and how would they be in the circumstances to break these laws?. This is why it could be suggested that this proportion of the UK public could be a target for campaigns and government funded medical support to help tackle the ever growing disease that is lung cancer.

From the evidence that is available it could be suggested that a mobile screening unit would be beneficial to the H&F PCT. Screening for lung cancer is a very...
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