Can Breaking the Law Ever Be Justified?

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 2892
  • Published : December 7, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
Anav Pradhan (GP2)
Can breaking the law ever be justified?
Imagine a world without those brave people who dared to not abide by the law and fight for a right. A world without Gandhi would be a world without independent India; without Mandela there would be white superiority in Africa; without freedom fighters, there would be no democracy in Nepal. I believe that all the actions of such law breakers are good, even though they were against various laws, and such actions can be justified to some extent. Even though laws are meant to maintain order and protect rights, it is not always justified; some might be unfair to minorities whereas others might stir up a revolution. Some just violate human rights. In such cases, civil disobedience might be necessary. “Freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed” said Martin Luther King Jr. The righteousness of revolt is shown by this remark made by a great revolutionary himself. Indeed, so much of justice has been served through revolutions. Gandhi, in India chased the British away through non-violent methods. Marching on, producing salt and breaking the law, Gandhi took a stubborn stance, without violent means, showing that they would not handle the British rule anymore. This established a happier independent India. Similarly, Mandela broke the racial barrier in South Africa, by breaking the law he helped in establishing greater good. Another major reason for breaking the law is because of one’s religion or culture. The French law has recently banned wearing the Islamic attire called ‘niqab’. An extreme effort to bring equality into the Muslim society, it is equally an imposition to women’s freedom. People put religion before law in some cases and rightfully so. It is not moral for the law to tell someone what not to wear; it is taking the freedom of choice away. It is a violation of human rights and not at all worthy of being called an offense. Similarly, public nudity is also...
tracking img