Cadbury Chocolate

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Cadbury Dairy Milk
Cadbury dominates the chocolate market in India with a 70% share of the market. Cadbury Dairy Milk is its largest chocolate brand which accounts fro a third of every chocolate bar consumed.  

The Task:
In 2005 the task before Cadbury Dairy Milk was to increase its consumer franchise.

The Strategy:
* The task was to get the youth audience to adopt Cadbury Dairy Milk in the sweet eating or " muh meetha karna" moments * The campaign of " Jab Pappu Pass Ho jaye, Kuch Meetha Ho jaye" captured the thought of celebrating a moment of delight with Dairy Milk * A campaign was built around the idea of how "pappu" celebrated passing his exams with Dairy Milk

The Media:
* A multi-media campaign was launched on TV, Internet, Radio and Outdoor * The key was how do own the moment of " pappu passing his exams" in the media space * An innovative tie -up with Reliance webworld was executed, wherein students across 66 examination boards across the company could access their results on Rworld through their Reliance mobiles. If they passed a message congratulating them on their moment of delight from Dairy Milk was displayed

The Results:
The activity contacted 20 MN students across the country and was awarded a Bronze Lion at the Cannes Media awards in 2005  
Beverage boost
Malted beverages are growing at about 20 per cent now, unlike seven years ago when their growth rates were on the slide.. |

Healthy growth (In file pic above) Darsheel Safary of Taare Zameen Par fame in a promotional campaign for Horlicks Debabrata Das
Roudra Bhattacharya
Which is harder, getting your child to drink milk or do maths? The answer is that it depends on how you flavour both. Just as a good teacher can make maths interesting, a good flavour can sell a million tonnes of malted/milk-based beverages. This is important because the market for these beverages has taken off, and is currently growing at about 20 per cent a year. In 2002, the market had been declining by 7 per cent. So, given such a healthy growth rate, new players should be able to enter the market and dip into the pail easily, right? Wrong, as Nestle just discovered. Its brand, Milo, quietly bit the dust some months ago when the company decided to stop production. According to the trade, irregular distribution and lack of marketing did it in. Even at its peak, its market share never went up beyond 3 per cent, say sources in the trade. By March-April 2009, however, this figure had dropped to a meagre 0.5 per cent. Nestle declined to comment on whether this failure was the result of it having a different taste as compared to its international variants. Nevertheless, an unfazed Nestle is considering introducing a ready-to-drink milk-based beverage called Milo Smart Plus. The product is being test marketed currently, says a spokesperson for the company. GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), Cadbury and Heinz have done better. They have seen their milk-based beverages become a major component of their product line-up. Of course, these companies have the advantage of being in the market for relatively longer. GSK’s Horlicks, for example, has been in the Indian market since the 1930s, before undergoing a revamp in 2003 when the whole industry was stagnating and the products in this segment were beginning to acquire an ‘old-fashioned’ image. Lion’s share

Years of experience in the market have given GSK a decisive edge over others and its brands have continued their dominance through the ages. Apart from being the ‘secret’ of Sachin Tendulkar’s energy, Boost has also enabled GSK to capture a lion’s share of the milk beverages market. GSK’s Executive Vice-President (Marketing), Subhajit Sen, says, “Horlicks and Boost give us two-thirds of the market share in milk-based beverages.” Boost alone holds a 13 per cent market share all over India while in South India this figure goes up to 24 per cent. It’s clear from these numbers that these beverages...
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