Business Intelligence

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 88
  • Published : May 24, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
    

    

2 Literature Review     

2.1Decision-­‐Making    
Decisions    are    being    made    in    organizations    every    day,    both    small    everyday    decisions    and     decisions    related    to    the    organization's    strategy.    According    to    Cleland    &    King    (1983)    any     decision    problem    involves    several    important    elements,    and    a    decision    may    be    viewed    as     the    final    outcome    of    a    process,    or    a    choice    between    various    options,    and    the    option    you     choose     involves     a     commitment     to     an     action     (Jacobsen     &     Thorsvik,     2007;     Olsen,     2011).     According     to     Olsen     (2011):     “Decision     making     can     be     described     as     a     process     where     an     individual    or    a    cluster    of    individuals    recognizes    a    choice    or    judgment    to    be    made”    (p.    1).             

Within    decision-­‐making,    there    are    three    important    points    that    must    be    addressed    when     it    comes    to    information;    Information    collection;    systemizing,    analyzing    and    interpreting     the    information;    and    then    communicating    the    information    to    the    right    decision-­‐making     forums    (Jacobsen    &    Thorsvik,    2007).    The    decision-­‐process    can    be    seen    as    a    unity    of    pre-­‐ decision,    decision    and    post-­‐decision    stages    (Zeleny,    1982).                 

The     person     that     makes     the     decisions     is     called     the     decision     maker,     and     that     person     is     faced     with     the     initial     problem     (Cleland     &     King,     1983).     “The     decision     maker’s     desires     to     achieve    some    state    of    affairs     –    objectives    -­‐    are    the    reason    for    the    existence    of    a    problem”     (Cleland     &     King,     1983,     p.     85).     According     to     Cleland     and     King     (1983)     these     objectives     should    have    a    connection    with    the    organizations    overall    strategy    and    goals.    The    heart    of     any    decision    problem    is    that    there    are    alternative    actions    to    take,    and    a    state    of    doubt    as     to    which    action    is    the    most    suitable    one    (Cleland    &    King,    1983).    Keeney    (1994)    however,     argues    that    it    is    values    and    not    alternatives    that    should    be    the    primary    focus    of    decision-­‐ making.     Michael     Hammer     (1990)     introduced     his     principals     of     reengineering     in     1990,     and     of     them     was;     “Put    the    decision    point    where    the    work    is    performed    and    build    control     into    the    process”    (p.    111).    With    businesses    having    a    hierarchical    structure,    the    decision-­‐ makers     are     often     the     managers,     and     Hammer     believed     that     the     persons     that     actually     work     on     the     specific     process     should     have     the     power     to     make     decisions     regarding     it,     because    they    have    more    knowledge.    By    doing    this,    Michael    Hammer    indicated    that    one     would    get    a    flatter    organizational    structure    (Hammer,    1990).             

Furthermore,    we    can    also    say    that    there    are    two    basic    approaches    to    decision-­‐making,     the     outcome-­‐oriented     approach     and     the     process-­‐oriented     approach     (Zeleny,     1982).     In    ...
tracking img