Business Environment

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BRIGHTON SCHOOL OF BUSINESS & MANAGEMENT
ASSIGNMENT COVER SHEET

NameAGRAJA DESAI

Address: P.O.BOX 21718 KITWE, ZAMBIA
Post code / Zip:
STUDENT NUMBER 3918
Telephone No: +260979000808
Email Address: agrajad@gmail.com
Date: 21/02/13
Course Name:
Tutor Name: PAT WELLOCK

UNIT TITLE NO. 1 BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT
DRAFT
Date Submitted 28/02/2013

UNIT 1 BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT
INTRODUCTION
In this Unit I will provide my understanding of different organisations, the influence of stakeholders and the relationship between businesses and the local, national and global environments. SECTION 1

UNDERSTANDING THE ORGANISATIONAL PURPOSES OF BUSINESSES
* Identify the purposes of different types of businesses
I am going to identify the purposes of different types of organisations, describe the extent to which an organisation meets the objectives of different stakeholders, and explain the responsibilities of an organisation and strategies employed to meet them. I am also going to be using examples from my desk research. Organisations are a social unit or people that are structured and managed to meet a need or to pursue collective goals. They can take shape in many forms such as large scale national organisations such as big news companies to small local businesses such as restaurants or gyms. “Organisations may be defined as a group of individuals, large or small, that is cooperation under the direction of executive leadership in accomplishment of certain common objects” (Keith Davis, 1997) When we are identifying the different types of organisations, there are four main sectors that need to be considered; these are: public sector organisations, private sector organisations, charitable organisations, and voluntary organisations. Public sector organisations are owned and run by the Government, for the people of the state. The people pay taxes to the government, which is used to finance most of the public sector. The main purpose of this type of organisation is to provide essential public services, and to use resources well for the benefit of the community of that particular state. Even within government, there are two important parts; central government, and local government. They could be set up to gain benefits of large scale productions, or to protect employment in areas of high unemployment. Some examples of the responsibilities of central government organisations are defence, roads, prisons, police, universities etc. Public corporations are companies that are owned by the central government in which a minister appoints a chairperson and board of directors to run the company on behalf of the government. Public corporations receive grants from the government as well as raise finance from the public. E.g. The BBC. Similarly, some examples of responsibilities of local government organisations are primary and secondary education, council housing, parks and sports facilities, libraries etc. Private sector businesses such as sole traders, partnerships, companies (public and private), corporations and franchises are owned and run by private individuals. The main purpose of this type of organisation is to provide a service and make profits, increase market shares, maximise sales, and increase business growth. Although these organisations are owned privately and their profits are their own, the way in which they operate can be hugely dictated through government legislations. Voluntary and charitable sector organisations or groups are not owned by individual people, however, someone is responsible for ensuring that is sets targets and budgets and does what it is set up to do. In most cases, voluntary organisations are set up to try to help particular types of people, eg guide dogs for the blind, orphanages, etc. In order for a voluntary organisation to survive, it must spend no more that it takes in through fundraising, grants, donations etc. This is in...
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