Business Analysis

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Running head: Individual Business Analysis Part III

Abstract
In this paper I will present the following about FedEx: How recent economic trends are influencing the business. Strategies the FedEx have used or could use for adapting to changing markets, such as an economic downturn or recession. Tactics that FedEx has implemented or could implement to achieve their strategic goals. The role human resource management plays in helping the company achieve its business goal. Ask the question: If I would be willing to invest in this company as a mutual fund manager? Also I well be giving my opinion about FedEx as a company to show they have the financial stability within the marketplace.

Business Analysis Part III
FedEx is a great company to invest in; they have I think in opinion adapted well within the marketplace as a fierce competitor. Seeing that FedEx was once just an assignment for college course; I find that to be an example of a dream coming true. In this paper below I will explain how recent economic trends are influencing the business including the spending of the customers affected the business. Strategies the FedEx have used or could use for adapting to changing markets, such as an economic downturn or recession. Tactics that FedEx has implemented or could implement to achieve their strategic goals. The role human resource management plays in helping the company achieve its business goal.

Economic Trends
The importance of the customer is one of the economic trends for FedEx pretty

much this company are in need of the customers to survive within the marketplace. The

phrase “customer-centric” has never been more important than it is today. With the

arrival of the “information age”, consumers world-wide know what is available, what

everyone else is buying and how to find it online at the lowest cost. With this power has

come the ability to shape markets, and define the products that they want.

Manufacturers no longer have the power to define a market in their own closed space.

The phrase “build it and they will come” no longer applies – you must know what the

customer wants in advance if you want any chance of survival. And once you have

delivered what the customer wants, your product and your customer support must both

be perfect, because in this age, word-of-mouth doesn’t just reach family and friends, it

reaches the world. There was a time when a brand’s “message” was local. Even

corporations that had a global footprint (General Motors, SONY, Coke/Pepsi, etc.) still

had customized messages that were appropriate (and targeted) at the local, or at least

regional, level. And they stayed there. Today, that world is gone. With the rise of the

Internet and a population that increasingly views world travel as just another part of life,

messages and brand images no longer stay where you put them. Instead, they go viral.

They get picked up on YouTube. They’re seen by travelers. They’re found on the

internet (occasionally in a blog with a title like “the 10 worst marketing translations”).

They are everywhere. Moving forward, the “message” that a corporation presents must

be global in nature, or at the least, local and regional messages must be cultivated in

such a way as to work on a global scale. From a business perspective, this isn’t a bad

thing at all. In fact, get creative with your international message and perhaps you’ll get

lucky and it will go viral. FedEx Corporation is responsible for the direction of FedEx

which is comprised of FedEx Express, FedEx Ground, FedEx Freight, FedEx Office,

FedEx Custom Critical, FedEx Trade Networks, and FedEx Services. FedEx started in

1998 and wanted to expand their express delivery service so that they could diversify

their portfolio ultimately to compete in the market on a global scale. In 2000, FedEx

acquired a new subsidiary called Tower Group...
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