Burger King vs. Mcdonald

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 476
  • Published : November 20, 2006
Open Document
Text Preview
MCDONALD OR BURGER KING

Remember when eating out used to be a treat? Over the past 40 years, we have moved out of the kitchen and into the car for mealtime. Nearly one-quarter of all meals are eaten away from home. The odds that frequently eating fast food meals can "super size" you are real. But to prevent unwanted and unhealthy weight gain, is it enough to change your choice of food, drink, or portion sizes at fast food restaurants? Or do we need to change your attitudes about eating and the places where you eat? Recently, the fast food restaurant launched a "one dollar" menu to their product line. It is a group of items on a fast food restaurant menu that are usually priced at one dollar or more. The consumer ultimately decides what to get based on what the menu offers. McDonald's is considered the first user of this type of menu, and other fast food restaurants, such as Burger King, rapidly followed suit by including value menu products in their course offerings. However, which one we are going to choose if I have only one dollar in my pocket: McDonald's or Burger King? McDonald's was founded as a barbecue drive-in in 1940 by two brothers, Dick and Mac McDonald. After discovering that most of their profits came from hamburgers, the brothers closed their restaurant for three months and reopened it in 1948 as a walk-up stand offering a simple menu of hamburgers, french fries, shakes, coffee, and Coca-Cola. The food was served in disposable paper wrapping. As a result, they were able to produce hamburgers and fries constantly and inexpensively, without waiting for customer orders. It was about half the price at a typical diner. Their streamlined production method, the "Speedee Service System," was influenced by the production line innovations of Henry Ford. Later, the milkshake machine salesman named Ray Kroc traveled to California to discover the secret to their high-volume burger-and-shake operation. Kroc thought he could expand their concept. He bought...
tracking img