Bullying Behaviors and Attachment Styles: Article Analysis

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Bullying Behaviors and Attachment Styles
Brandon McKay
Prince George's Community College

Abstract
The article is titled Bullying Behaviors and Attachment Styles. This article studies in detail how a child's attachment to their parents can have an effect on their relationship wit their peers. The discussions of physical and relational abrasion are coincided with the differences between boy and girl victimization. The correlation between parental anxiety and or avoidance and the engagement in bullying is also researched. To sum it up this article will sow wetter or not the attachment a child as with one or both of their parents as an effect on their behavior towards bullying.

Bullying Behaviors and Attachment Styles
The purpose of the study was to determine whether there are links among attachment styles, bullying and victimization. Bullying is typically defined as repeated relational or physical aggression directed to one or more peers. Parental involvement, parental divorce, and parental stress have been shown to predict aggressive behavior in children and adolescents. Participation in bullying was expected to relate to their avoidance for attachment to ones parents. Previous studies have found that individuals who are insecure-avoidant in attachment are more likely to show signs of antisocial traits, as well as less likely to form close relationships with others. Those with secure patterns of attachment have shown more optimistic attributes towards judgments of others and better problem solving skills in resolving personal conflict and lower levels of aggression. With this information, it was hypothesized that those who were secure or insecure-ambivalent in attachment to mother would show lower rates of bullying compared to insecure-avoidant individuals. Children who were insecure-ambivalent in attachment to their mother were expected to show higher rates of victimization compared to those who...
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