Building a Knowledge Based Society

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Building a Knowledge Based Society|
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By 87817|
12/10/2008|

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Contents

Introduction………………………………………… 3

History………………………………………………..4

Why a knowledge based Society…………………….5

Universities and Their Role…………………………7

Social Impact…………………………………………8

Conclusion…………………………………………...10

Bibliography…………………………………………11

Introduction

The Government in recent years have become aware of the changes in society and the workforce. The economy is directly affected by what the labour market is and what the future skills base will be. The U.K. is falling behind other nations and the Government is looking towards higher education, particularly Universities, to address some of these problems. In this report issues such as history, social changes, economy and how they affect the nation will be looked at. How, in the future, people in society will have to adapt to an ever changing world. Issues that concerned society in the past have changed and the labour market of the future will have a direct impact on environmental issues that will affect the future generations.

History
The industrial revolution saw the first major changes in society’s attitude towards education. Although there were many problems that needed to be address such as living standards and working conditions, the government tried to tackle the problem of education. The higher classes did not see any reason to educate the working class nor did the working class see any reason to be educated. Child labour was common, with parents reluctant to give up these earnings for the benefit of education. The government were more concerned at first with the question of what to do with the poor but attitudes changed as they realised that education could be used to resolve these problems. The various factory acts in the 1800’s also contributed to a shift towards education as better working conditions and a restriction on child labour were introduced. . Through the 1900’s governments attitudes towards education have changed from one of optimism to despair and back again. Hargreaves. A (2003.13). Education in the U.K. was looked a pond in a new light in the postwar years of 1944 with the introduction of R.A. Butler’s Education Act. Raising the school leaving age to 15 and introducing the Ministry of Education. Sanderson. M (1994). Since then there have been several educational bills of the most recent is Lord Leitch’s report on the growing gap in skills of the British workforce. Other nations in the Far East and more recently in the Middle East have put more focus on education. This has resulted in their economies growing, with the western governments reacting in different ways. In the United States a report A Nation at Risk suggest that Americans would be more alarmed if such nations were advancing further in military expertise than in education. Hargreaves. A (2003.13). In the 1980’s the British government had mixed opinions on whether or not education was the answer. With their miss spelt slogan “Education isn’t Wurking” the Conservatives were suggesting that the answer lay somewhere else. Hargreaves. A (2003.13). History suggest that moving towards a knowledge Based Society will improve the lives of people across the Globe. A shift from an industrial economy of production to a workforce that concentrated more on services, ideas and communication is an ever growing concern that governments are taking note of. In the past the phrase ‘a job for life’ was commonly used and meant quite simply that some people could be employed in the same occupation, for all their working lives and with the same employer. This is now no longer the case and people find that they have to be trained and re –trained through out their working lives.

Why a Knowledge Based Society
The legacy of the Industrial Revolution is that of the ‘production of goods’ whether it be cotton shirts or cars. It also contributed to disposable income and time that the...
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