Brutus the Tragic Hero

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Amanda Howard

Mrs. Andrews

Language Arts 12

08 March 2013

Brutus the Tragic Hero

The Title “Tragic Hero” can be interpreted many ways and means many things. A tragic hero could be someone who fell from power because of a mistake or weakness of one’s self. A tragic hero can also be someone who makes a mistake and doesn’t realize it until it’s too late but take their fate in curse but accepts their tragedy humbly. Marcus Brutus was a tragic hero whose fate was sealed by his own friends, his way of thinking or personality, and dedication to the roman people and Rome itself. Brutus’s personality was a big part of his fall from prosperity. Brutus was loyal, trustworthy, honorable, and dedicated. Those are good qualities of his personality. Brutus himself was very fond of Caesar. He made sure Caesar was alright and did everything Caesar said without question. Overall Brutus had to make a tough decision. He was loyal to both Rome and his best friend Caesar all the while having a constant internal battle with deciding what meant more to him his love for Caesar or his love for Rome and the roman people. Brutus says “So Caesar may. Then, lest even he may prevent. And since the quarrel Will bear no color for the thing he is, Fashion it thus: that what he is, augmented, would run to these and these extremities” (II.i.28-32). After his final decision he still doubted himself on if it was actually the right choice. That what made him a perfect target for his so called “friends”. Even though Brutus’s personality was a big part of his downfall the main part of it was contributed to some of his so called friends involved in the conspiracy. Cassius resented Caesar because the roman public viewed Caesar as a god and hates how much power he had. Cassius says, “Did I tired Caesar. And this man is now become a god, and Cassius a wretched creature must bend his body If Caesar carelessly but nod at him” (I.ii.122-125). Cassius then leads...
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