Bros: Gender and Guy Code

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The article “’Bros Before Hos’: The Guy Code” by Michael Kimmel, chronicles the negative perception that men have for the “weaker” man through a list of unwritten rules of men. It stated that this “guy code,” was or is, essentially, what defined masculinity. Many descriptions of weakness include homophobic words like “faggot” and “gay.” Words that pertain more to women, like “pussy” or “mama’s boy,” are also used as an insult to describe a man’s weakness. This is because of the low status that men had been taught throughout the years. Masculinity, Kimmel says, is attributed through peers, male figures in their lives, and a “hard-wired” definition of what being man means. Once a man steps outside of those lines, the risk is looking being emasculated. Kimmel also brings up another point that the rules of masculinity is not for the women in their lives but for the men, impress a man rather than a woman. Kimmel further discussed that because of the homophobia and the fear of being as seen effeminate, a man tends to live a bit more dangerously. An example would be taking risks, being more aggressive, not showing emotions, to the little things like putting on a seatbelt. Overall, Kimmel tries to explain this masculinity that plagues men.

When reading the article, I thought, “This isn’t a fair assessment on men’s masculinity,” the reason being? It’s because most of the men Kimmel had questioned lives in the east coast, which has a lower percentage of same-sex marriages and homosexuals. If these questions were asked in a less homophobic part of the country, like Washington or California, then there would be a better chance of getting a more gender equal survey. Also, Kimmel’s use of “America” is far too broad, saying that this ideal of masculinity applies to the more than a hundred races in America. With immigrants coming in from different countries and different cultures… it’s almost egoistic to think that every male out here in America would think this way. Though...
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