Bromo

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 25
  • Published : February 17, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Tatiana Pachova BSc‐2, chemistry   
Assistant : Chandan Dey 
Sciences II – lab. A 
 
 

 

 
 Nitration of bromobenzene (n°28) 
1. INTRODUCTION 
 
1.1)

1.2)

Purpose 
 
The  objective  of  this  experiment  is  to  synthesize  the  p‐bromonitrobenzene  (bromo‐1‐nitro‐4‐benzene) out of bromobenzene, by nitration.   
Scheme 
 
Br

Br

HNO3 / H2SO4

 
 
Mechanism 
 
The first step is the formation of the NO2 from the nitric acid:   
NO2

1.3)

O

O
S

N
HO

O

O

HO

O
N

+ H2O + HSO4-

OH
O

 
 
The second step is the nucleophile attack of the bromobenzene on the NO2. The  temperature is moderated to avoid the formation of ortho and meta products:   

Br

Br
O

+ H+

N
O

 

NO2

2. PROCEDURE 
 

2.1)

Reaction 
 
In a 100mL twin‐neck bottom flask a mixture of nitric acid and sulfuric acid was  prepared  (cooled  down  with  an  ice  bath).  The  flask  was  then  equipped  with  a  thermometer  (not  to  let  the  temperature  go  over  50‐60°C)  and  a  refrigerator.  Bromobenzene  was  added  in  small  proportions  (1mL  at  a  time)  through  the  refrigerator and the solution was well agitated between each addition. Then, the  solution  was  heated  for  20min  at  100°C.  After  heating,  the  mixture  was  left  to  cool  down  a  little  and  then  poured  on  150g  of  ice.  The  crystals  left  on  the  flask  were dissolved in 10mL of hot ethanol and added to the suspension.   

 
Isolation 
 
The  solid  product  was  isolated  by  filtration,  washed  3  times  in  water  and  recrystallized in 50mL of ethanol. 

2.2)

3. DISCUSSION AND RESULTS 
 
3.1)

Observations 
 
When  the  bromobenzene  was  added,  the  solution  turned  yellow.  The  final  product was also yellow crystals. 
 
Yield 
 
molar mass [g/mol]  n th [mmol]  n exp [mmol]  yield [%] 

3.2)

202.99 

76 

35.0 

46% 

 
7.1124g of final product were collected at the end of the reaction. That represents  46%  of  yield,  which  is  in  similar  to  the  yield  indicated  by  the  protocol:  55%  (8.5g). 

4. SPECTROMETRY DATA 
 

4.1)

NMR 1H (CDCl3, 400MHz) 
 
The  molecule  is  symmetrical;  therefore  the  hydrogens  on  each  side  of  the  molecule are equivalent. 
 
Br

H2

H2

H1

H1

 
 
Br  has  a  stronger  unshielding  effect  than  the  nitro  group,  therefore  the  peaks  corresponding to H2 are more on the left. 
 
bond 
shift ∂ [ppm] 
multiplicity 
hydrogen 
NO2

C ‐ H 
C ‐ H 

8.134‐8.098 
7.721‐7.684 

Doublet of triplets 
Doublet of triplets 

H1 
H2 

 
The  coupling  is  strong,  so  there  is  a  roof  effect.  Also,  we  observe  doublets  of  triplets and not just doublets because of the 4J coupling.   
δ 8.116 (dt, J=9.2Hz, J=2.4 Hz, 2H); δ (dt, J=9.2Hz, J=2.4 Hz, 2H)    
4.2) IR (neat, cm‐1) 
 
1508; 1470; 1342‐1310; 1277; 1104; 1065; 837; 736; 674   
The  peaks  corresponding  to  the  aromatic  nitro  substituent  are  observed  at  1508  cm‐1 and 1342‐1310 cm‐1.  Therefore the product indeed was obtained. 

5. REFERENCES 

 
[1]  Travaux  Pratiques  de  Chimie  Organique  3ème  Semestre,  21  Novembre  2011  –  16  Mars 2012, 27 
[2] Silverstein, Bassler, Morrill, Spectrometric identification of organic compounds   

6. QUESTIONS 
 

1) What  secondary  product  is  expected  if  the  reaction  is  made  at  a  higher  temperature? 
 
At  higher  temperature,  we  expect  to  see  more  than  one  nitro  group  substituted on the bromobenzene.  

Br

Br
NO2

NO2

O2N
NO2

1-bromo-2,4-dinitrobenzene

NO2

1-bromo-2,4,5-trinitrobenzene

 
 
2) Why  do  we  only  isolate  the  p‐bromonitrobenzene  by  recrystallization  of  the  final product in ethanol? 
 
The p‐bromonitrobenzene must be less soluble in EtOH (in cold solution). The  solubility depends on the polarity and since the 1‐bromo‐2,4‐dinitrobenzene  is  more ...
tracking img