Broken Book Club

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  • Published : December 8, 2012
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In this modern age why do people stigmatize people with substance abuse issues? For the first time Cope is beginning to ask himself the right questions that will lead to sobriety. For example, he asked, “What did I mean by God? Where would I find this faith? Why was I the only one in our family who became addicted? And most importantly, why do I keep relapsing?” Cope realizes everything he has in his whole life depends on his sobriety. I think this is the first step for anyone recovering. Admitting you are powerless over drugs and alcohol goes hand in hand with realizing your whole life depends on your sobriety. Cope was no longer in a hurry to leave treatment. In fact the excuses he was using to leave treatment were the same excuses he used to stay in treatment. Cope finally admits to himself that pleasing people had always been his main ambition and the greatest affirmation of his worth. All he wanted was for people to know that he really was a good guy, a generous, kind, thoughtful person deep down. He wanted them to know so they would like him and approve of what he did. I think with Cope and probably with most addicts and alcoholics telling their story is also a big part of recovery. If people with substance abuse issues know that society won’t judge them because of their addiction and that people will like them even though they know about their past I think sobriety would be easier. I think a lot of people carry around feelings of guilt and shame regarding their addictions. They feel like failures, especially after relapsing. Who wants to admit to being a failure? Even worse, admitting you failed at your sobriety and having society judge you for failing. If more people look at addiction as a progressive disease maybe there would be less judgment passed upon people with substance abuse issues
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