British Gas Hrm Case Study

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British Gas HRM Case Study
Human Resource Planning & Development

Mobile - 07529726992
Email - tharangaps@gmail.com
2010
Tharanga Siriwardena
Student ID 104664
1/5/2010

Table of Contents
1.0 UK Energy Industry……………………………………………………………………..3 1.1 BRITISH GAS ……………………………………………………………………. 3-4 2.0 Challenges faces by HR managers at British Gas………………………….5-6 3.0 HRM Models

3.1 Guest’s model of HRM………………………………………………………7

3.2 The Harvard Model of HRM ……………………………………………..7-8

3.3 HR Activities of British Gas ……………………………………………….8

4.0 Recruitment and selection …………………………………………………………9 4.1 British Gas Recruitment and Selection Process …………………9-10 4.2 British Gas Targeted advertising ………………………………………10 4.3 Outreach …………………………………………………………………………10 4.4 Partnership working …………………………………………………………11

4.5 Taster days ……………………………………………………………………….11 4.6 Ambassadors …………………………………………………………………..11

5.0 Training and Development ………………………………………………………….12 5.1 British Gas Training & Development ………………………………….12

5.2 British Gas Academy ………………………………………………………… 12-1312-1BBBB 6.0 Performance Management …………………………………………………………………..14 6.1 British Gas Performance Management …………………………………………14 6.2 British Gas use following steps to review employee performances. 14

7.0 References …………………………………………………………………………………………….15 INTRODUCTION
1.0 UK Energy Industry

The UK enjoys a wealth of indigenous energy resources and has the technical expertise and experience to exploit them. Much of this expertise is being utilized in gainful commercial ventures overseas. In its position as one of the most energy-rich countries in Europe, the UK is uniquely placed to profit from a strong energy market. Expenditure on energy amounted to £99.87bn in 2008. UK householders spent £40.67bn on energy products, representing 5.2% of total consumer expenditure.

Privatization has provided the impetus for competition, resulting in a major restructuring of the energy industries and the companies involved. Restructuring commenced in the late 1980s with the privatization of the gas sector, closely followed by similar moves in the electricity, coal and nuclear sectors. Oil resources had always been in private hands. Full liberalization was achieved in May 1999, with the completion of the opening up of the electricity market. All consumers, both domestic and business, are now free to choose their supplier of gas or electricity.

A succession of bids, notably in the electricity sector where many of the regional electricity companies (RECs) are under new ownership, has changed the nature and structure of the energy industry. Thus, public electricity suppliers have evolved since privatization into complex structures embracing diverse businesses. Most have extended their interests into generation or are part of wider groups with major interests in generation. .

Acquisitions by foreign concerns, notably from the US and from Europe, have created a much more international industry. The £10bn take-over of Powered PLC by E.ON of Germany remains on track for completion in 2002. However, the cost of acquiring energy customers has become too high for some US energy groups. The collapse of Enron Corp., the energy trading group, in November 2001, was threatening to destabilize energy markets in the US and Europe.
1.1 BRITISH GAS...
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