British Food

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  • Topic: English cuisine, British cuisine, Full breakfast
  • Pages : 12 (3930 words )
  • Download(s) : 315
  • Published : December 13, 2012
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Independent Work
Theme: British food

Done by: Mirvaliyev A.
Cheked by: Valitova M.

Tashkent 2012
Bibliography

1. Weber, Robert E. England's Heritage Food and Cooking., 1988. 2. Walter, Our Favourite Recipes, Inc., 1988.
3. Wikipedia.com

Content
1. British Cuisine
2. A brief history
3. Today
4. Regional Specialities
5. Pies, Puddings, Buns and Cakes
6. The Great British Breakfast!
7. The Sunday Roast
8. How it all began
9. Nowadays
10. Bubble and Squeak
11. Fish and Chips
12. Steaks - an American tradition?
13. British Cheese
14. The Humble Sandwich - yes that's ours too!
15. Indian Cuisine in the UK The future
16. Genetically modified food

British Cuisine!

Yes, we do have a wide and varied cuisine in Britain today, no more do we suffer under the image of grey boiled meat! After years of disparagement by various countries (especially the French) Britain now has an enviable culinary reputation. In fact some of the great chefs now come from Britain, I kid you not! [pic]

However Britain's culinary expertise is not new! In the past British cooking was amongst the best in the world. Mrs Beeton is still one of the renowned writers of cookery books, her creations have now gained international popularity, years after her death. Traditional British cuisine is substantial, yet simple and wholesome. We have long believed in four meals a day. Our fare has been influenced by the traditions and tastes from different parts of the British empire: teas from Ceylon and chutney, kedgeree, and mulligatawny soup from India.

A brief history

British cuisine has always been multicultural, a pot pourri of eclectic styles. In ancient times influenced by the Romans and in medieval times the French. When the Frankish Normans invaded, they brought with them the spices of the east: cinnamon, saffron, mace, nutmeg, pepper, ginger. Sugar came to England at that time, and was considered a spice -- rare and expensive. Before the arrival of cane sugars, honey and fruit juices were the only sweeteners. The few Medieval cookery books that remain record dishes that use every spice in the larder, and chefs across Europe saw their task to be the almost alchemical transformation of raw ingredients into something entirely new (for centuries the English aristocracy ate French food) which they felt distinguished them from the peasants. During Victorian times good old British stodge mixed with exotic spices from all over the Empire. And today despite being part of Europe we've kept up our links with the countries of the former British Empire, now united under the Commonwealth. One of the benefits of having an empire is that we did learn quite a bit from the colonies. From East Asia (China) we adopted tea (and exported the habit to India), and from India we adopted curry-style spicing, we even developed a line of spicy sauces including ketchup, mint sauce, Worcestershire sauce and deviled sauce to indulge these tastes. Today it would be fair to say that curry has become a national dish. Among English cakes and pastries, many are tied to the various religious holidays of the year. Hot Cross Buns are eaten on Good Friday, Simnel Cake is for Mothering Sunday, Plum Pudding for Christmas, and Twelfth Night Cake for Epiphany. Unfortunately a great deal of damage was done to British cuisine during the two world wars. Britain is an island and supplies of many goods became short. The war effort used up goods and services and so less were left over for private people to consume. Ships importing food stuffs had to travel in convoys and so they could make fewer journeys. During the second world war food rationing began in January 1940 and was lifted only gradually after the war. The British tradition of stews, pies and breads, according to the taste buds of...
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