British Character

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British character
"The British are definitely romantic,

much more romantic then Italians ..."

Generally British people are polite. During my first visit to London I remember seeing a man in the underground asking for information from a ticket seller. The latter didn't replay and the man said "Thank you very much", started working off, and then turned around and said "fuck you, stupid".

So, for me, the British people are polite, but this way of behaviour is probably a mask for all kind of other feeling. They may be polite partly because they are afraid of drama and of confrontation. For this reason, they also may be attracted to "dramatic" people, like the Italian.

I would like to research into English people (my first wife is, in her own words, "a Londoner”). In our life, I find that Clare reacts and behaves in ways which I would describe as "British", or more specially English.

For the sake of simplicity I will use the word "British", although we should not, as my fife keeps on telling me, forget that the Scottish, for example (yes she has Scots blood too) are an altogether different species. More immediately expressive, direct and hot-tempered, for example, then the English and the Welsh. Scottish people may be more open to foreign countries and contacts because they have traditionally looked for contacts.

British traditions are rather interesting and unusual. If you arrive in Great Britain, you’ll hear the word “tradition” everywhere. Englishmen have a sentimental love for things and traditions because they are old. They never throw away old things.

In many houses of Great Britain they have fireplaces and though their bedrooms are awfully cold, the English people don’t want to have central heating because they don’t want to have changes. Therefore the Yeomen-Warders are dressed in traditional medieval clothes and the traditional dress of the House Guards regiment has existed since the 12th century. This dress costs a lot of money and seems very funny nowadays but Englishmen stand for it because it’s a tradition.

If you enter the Houses of Parliament, you’ll see the House of Lords and the House of Commons. In the House of Lords there are two rows of benches for lords and sack of wool for the Lord Chancellor to sit on. This is so because in the old times wool made England rich and powerful. In the House of Commons which is not big and quite simple, you’ll see two rows of benches for the two parties: the government — on one side and the opposition — on the other.

In front of the benches there is the strip of a carpet and when a member speaking in the House puts his foot beyond that strip, there is a shout “Order.” This dates from the time when the members had swords on them and during the discussion might want to start fighting. The word “order” reminded them that no fighting was allowed in the House.

And there are many other traditions. The traffic regulations in Great Britain differ from other countries: we keep to the left and you keep to the right. As you have already seen the English buses are very high, because they are double-decked, all of them are red. But the houses are not very big, they are mostly two-storied buildings.

Now we are in Fleet Street. The concentration of some professions in certain streets is a characteristic feature of London. If someone works in Fleet Street, you know he is a journalist, if someone works in Harley Street, you know that he is a medical man. It is also a tradition.

Customs and Traditions in the UK
Woodlands Junior School is in the south-east corner of England

Britain is full of culture and traditions which have been around for hundreds of years. British customs and traditions are famous all over the world. When people think of Britain they often think of people drinking tea, eating fish and chips and wearing bowler hats, but...
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