British Arts

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tishTOPIC 14: BRITISH ARTS

Outline:
I. Introduction
II. Content
1. Overview of the arts in Britain
1.1. What are “the arts”?
1.2. The arts in society
1.3. The characteristics of British arts and letters 1. Types of arts
2.4. Theatre and cinema
2.5. Music
2.6. Literature
2.7. The fine arts
III. Conclusion

1. Overview of the arts in Britain
2.1. What are “The arts”?
The art is the term which is used to refer to literature, music, painting, sculpture, film, opera, crafts, theatre, ballet etc. This term is usually called “umbrella term” and usually implies seriousness, so that core examples of these art activities which regarded as “light” may be referred to simply as “entertainment”. Art, or fine arts is often used to refer to those arts which use space, but not time, for their appreciation. For example, this is what is covered by the subject ‘art’ in schools. The word “culture” has several meanings. It can be used in its anthropological sense to mean ‘way of life’. But many people also use it as a synonym for ‘the arts’. Dance usually refers to modern artistic dance forms; ballet usually has a more traditional feel, unless we say modern ballet. A novel is a long story, e.g. 200-300 pages, a short prose fiction, e.g. 10 pages, is a short story.

2.2. The arts in society
Interest in the arts in Britain is not highly appreciated by a large number of people in society. Nowadays, more people read books, go to galleries, go to theatre and attend concerts. However the most British people prefer their sport, their television and video and other free-time activities to cultural activities. In Britain, the arts are met with a mixture of public apathy and private enthusiasm. Publicly, the arts are accepted and tolerated but not encouraged. The supporting of government about financial for the arts is one of the lowest of any western country. Thatcherism had a principle, it was that the arts should be driven by “ market force”. Subject such as art and music tend to push the sidelines. The arts are not normally given a very high level of publicity. Television programs on cultural’ subjects are usually shown late at night. Each summer, many high-quality arts festivals take place around the country, but the vast majority of people do not even know of their existence. The British are keen on present themselves as a nation of philistines. Hundreds of thousands of people are enthusiastically involved in one or other of the arts, but with more or less amateur or part time status.

2.3. The characteristics of British arts and letters
The characteristics of British work in the arts seems to stand out, it lacks identification with wider intellectual trends. It is not usually ideologically committed, nor associated with particular political movements. For example, playwrights and directors can be left-wing in their political outlook, but the plays which they produce rarely convey a straightforward political message. The same is largely true of British novelist and poets. They tend to be individualistic, exploring emotions rather than ideas, the personal rather than the political. Whatever the critics say, it is quite common for British playwrights and novelists to claim that they just record ‘what they see’ and that they do not consciously intend any social or symbolic message. Similarly, British work in the arts also ten to be individualistic with its own field. Artists do not usually consider themselves to belong to this or that movement. In any field of the arts, even those in which British artists have strong international reputations, it is difficult to identify a ‘British school’. The style of the arts also tends to be conventional. The avant- garde exists, but with the possible exception of painting and sculpture, it is not through such work that British artists become famous. In the 1980s, Peter Brook...
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