British Airways

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“British Airways Strategy & Information Systems”

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1: MISSION STATEMENT3
CHAPTER 2: GOALS AND OBJECTIVES4
CHAPTER 3: ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS5
PEST ANALYSIS5
SWOT ANALYSIS7
CHAPTER 4: INFORMATIONS SYSTEMS8
INFORMATION SYSTEMS AT OPERATIONAL LEVEL8
INFORMATION SYSTEMS AT MANAGERIAL LEVEL11
INFORMATION SYSTEMS AT STRATEGIC LEVEL13
CHAPTER 5: SUGGESTED STRATEGY14
REFERENCES AND BIBLIOGRAPHY15

Mission Statement:

“To be the most exclusive and first choice airline for all airline travelers”

We recommend a new mission statement after a consultation process involving our group members. The mission statement can replace an existing statement, which had been drawn up in 1997 in the run-up to privatization, and many employees have received training in its meaning for their particular jobs.

In introducing our new mission we cited Peter Drucker 5 questions

What is our business (Airline)
Who is our customer (Travelers)
What is the value of customer (First)
What will our business be (Most exclusive)
What should our business be (Choice)

Our mission statement clearly shows that in every person’s mind the first thing to come for traveling by air should be British Airways. Whatever it is called, a vision, mission or strategic intent, its purpose is to provide a guiding light for the future. Companies without a mission are prone to opportunism. A unifying mission is especially important in large companies where staff and managers are expected to take decisions themselves, without constant referral back to headquarters or to their seniors. If everyone understands where the company is aiming, then independent decisions are more likely to be aligned with each other and with the companies’ ultimate objective. A mission enables a business to set objectives, to develop strategies, to concentrate its resources. It alone enables a business to be managed for performance. Campbell and Yeung (1998) emphasized that whilst the mission statement itself is clearly important, it is also important for managers to instill a ‘sense of mission’ in employees. The success of the mission requires the behavior of employees to match the values of the company, but such harmony is difficult to achieve and requires the mission as it is implemented to become embedded as part of the organizational culture. It is the objective that subsumes all others beneath it. It can be used to clearly communicate the objectives and values of the organization to the various stakeholder groups and it can be argued that it assists in promoting hierarchical congruence A mission statement can be seen as the starting point for an organization’s entire planning process since it requires senior management to sit down and seriously consider where the firm is and where it should be in the future. This point was emphasized by two leading management writers, when they stated that, ‘in business like in art, what distinguishes leaders from laggards, and greatness from mediocrity, is the ability to uniquely imagine what could be’ (Hamel and Prahalad, 1994: 25).

Goals:

“To provide excellent customer service to its passengers” “To be the airline of first choice within our key markets” “To be a leader and driving change in airline industry”

Objectives:

“To strengthen and enhance the exclusive image of British Airways worldwide” “To introduce brand standard guidelines to have same standards worldwide” “To undertake market research to monitor the world economic conditions and travel trends in order to identify market opportunities” “To continuously improve in flight scheduling, luggage timings and approach to safety”

The combined goals and objectives provide the parameters and relevance for business plans for each of the key areas of business (the SBUs), which in turn are used to set each year’s budget for each department. The business plan and budget...
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