Bridge to a Wiseman's Cove Analytical Essay

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A Bridge to Wiseman’s Cove, written by James Moloney is about Carl, the protagonist, abandoned by his mother and was sent to stay with their aunt with his younger brother in Wattle Beach. It is through events and relationships that the author crafts the psychological and emotional journey Carl embarks on. James Moloney administered literary techniques such as setting, characterisation and symbolism to demonstrate reader Carl’s journey. Moloney employs setting to demonstrate Carl’s emotional journey. In his sister’s house, Carl overhears his sister trying to sell his missing mother’s home. “It’s your turn… mum never comes back… I’ve got my own life… It’s only for a few weeks” (page 11). By employing Carl’s sister, Sarah to show the lack of familial love or responsibility, the author provides the audience with a starting point for Carl’s journey. Also, Moloney paints Carl’s journey to Wattle Beach as one of healing. “… hypnotic… a comfort… antidote to their leaving” (page 12). The emotional goodbye and guilt felt by Sarah affected Carl when the author describes the bus ride as monotonous, though filled with feelings of uneasiness because Carl does not know what his future holds. The author utilises the shop as an unwelcoming place to demonstrate an overview of the possible beginning of Carl’s new life. In this quote, “Not taking any responsibility” (page 13), Moloney uses Mr Nugent’s grumpiness to demonstrate how unwanted Carl in Wattle Beach would be. James Moloney made use of characterisation to construct Carl’s psychological and emotional state throughout his journey. He shaped him as obese, a person that comes from a dysfunctional family and an outcast. Carl’s physical appearance and family background, portrayed by Moloney, affected him psychologically. When Carl is offered a job on the barge, this gives him an opportunity to change his negative body image. “He was ashamed of his fleshy bulges… only solitary human being” (page 23 and 37). Carl’s outward...
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