Bric: Culture, Values, and Business Ethics

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BRIC
Cultures, Values, and Business Ethics
Gabrielle Mastaglio
SUNY Oswego

Marketing 390
Kenneth Shaw
December 1, 2012

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. Introduction………………………………………………………...………………………….3 2. Brazil………………………………………………………………..…………………………3 3.1 Brazil’s Culture and Values…………………………………………..……………………….4 3.2 Business Etiquette in Brazil……………………………...……………..……………………..5 3. Russia………………………………………………………………………………………….6 4.3 Russia’s Culture and Values…………………………………………………………………..7 4.4 Business Etiquette in Russia ………………………………………………………………….8 4. India …………………………………………………………………………………………...9 5.5 India’s Culture and Values……………………………………………………….....…………9 5.6 Business Etiquette in India…………………...………………………………………………10 5. China…………………………………………………………………………………………11 6.7 China’s Culture and Values………………………………………………………………….12 6.8 Business Etiquette in China………………………………………………………………….13 6. Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………………14 7. References……………………………………………………………………………………15

INTRODUCTION

BRIC, represents the countries Brazil, Russia, India, and China. These countries are known to be at similar stages of economic growth. The BRIC countries have had a huge success in the past decade with their industrialization and economic success. With the BRIC countries emerging as economic powerhouses and the increasing number of foreign counties increasing to do business with them, ethical rules must integrate into their business practices. An increasing number of companies are moving production to the BRICs in order to take advantage of generous tax incentives, high productivity rates, and cheap labor. Each country has cultures and values which makes them unique. They also have a very specific business ethic that one should know about if they want to be successful in these countries. BRAZIL

Brazil, known as the Federative Republic of Brazil, is the largest country in South America and in the Latin American region. It is the fifth largest country geographically and by population with a population of 190,732,694 according to the 2010 Census. It is known as one of the world’s fastest growing economies and is part of the United Nations, the G20, BRIC, and groups. Brazil is known for their economy having a growth rate during the world recession in 2008 (Vernengo, 2010). Brazil’s land use is 87% forest/woodland and meadows/pastures and has a climate which is known to be mostly tropical since they have the Amazon. Iron, gold, petroleum, and nickel are some of the many natural resources they are known for.

BRAZIL’S CUTURE AND VALUES

The Brazilians have a unique culture that they share with one another. First off, the official language is Portuguese which makes up almost 100 percent of the population. Brazilians have a strong national ideology that their land is a “racial democracy”. As far as the Brazilian class system goes, people with darker skin tend to be economically and socially disadvantaged. Class is determined by economic status and skin color. Women make up forty percent of the workforce but are found with lower paying jobs than males such as teaching, nursing, and jobs with clerical duties (Brazil - Language, Culture, Customs and Etiquette, n.d.). Common Brazilian foods consist of rice and beans which are put together with meats and fish. The most important meal of the day is a multicourse meal eaten after midday. Middle-class would eat the beans or rice with fish or meat and the lower class would only eat beans or meat during this meal. Now that Brazil is industrializing. The family-centered meal at midday is being replaced with smaller meals that are consumed at restaurants with buffets or fast-food such as McDonalds. The lower-calls who cannot afford this will generally eat at home, buy snacks on the street, or carry food with them at work. Brazil has a nation dish known as “feijoada” which means “big bean” stew. It consists of a variety of meats cooked with...
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