Breaking the Vicious Poverty Cycle

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Breaking the Vicious Poverty Cycle

Today, most experts agree that poverty in the United States is still rising, as layoffs rise and the economy stumbles. Meanwhile, the number of millionaires keeps growing. We are constantly told that capitalism represents the high point of human achievement. However, in a society that condemns large parts of the population to doubt about their ability to meet basic needs (food, education and health care), while millionaires spend thousands on luxuries; capitalism does not seems as the high development point of civilization.

Poverty should be considered beyond a monetary term because of its multiple implications in children’s development. Poverty is a vicious cycle. The poor cannot afford education, and the uneducated/unskilled cannot hope to earn enough to overcome poverty. Poverty goes beyond an economic condition; it often includes child abuse, school failure, juvenile delinquency, teen pregnancy, early death due to homicide or suicide, among other antisocial behaviours. Poverty diminishes the possibility that children will develop into competent adults who get well employed. Children development it is not only influenced by its learning capabilities but, it is shaped by the environment he/she is exposed to. Families in poverty are concentrated in the inner-city which provides lower quality schools, fewer good role models, less social control, which leads them to join teenage gangs with high crime rates. The United States surpassed other industrialized nations in violent crimes, including homicides. Constant poverty rates do not necessarily mean that the same number of people is in poverty compared to the past. The rate is only a percentage of the total population, which has grown through time. For example, in 1980, 12.6% of the population who lived in poverty was 28.5 million, but today the same percentage is 34.4 million people because the U.S. population has grown by 46.2 million since 1980...
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