Breakfast of Champions Condradictions

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Breakfast of Bullshit
Those who write on the human condition are often philosophers who write with convoluted language that few can understand. Kurt Vonnegut, however, focuses on the same questions, and provides his own personal answers with as much depth as that of the most educated philosopher. He avoids stilted language typical of philosophers, using shorter sentences, less complex vocabulary, humorous tangents, and outrageous stories to get his point across. With this style, Vonnegut presents the age-old question "How do we as humans live in this world?" in a manner appealing and understandable to the less educated mass. Vonnegut's novel is an exhibit of the flaws of a robotic, self-destructive society. In Breakfast of Champions, Kurt Vonnegut portrays a prefabricated, unfeeling society and an American culture plagued with despair, greed, and apathy.             Racism and discrimination in American society is a major aspect that Vonnegut attacks and plays an important role in Breakfast of Champions as well . As the American College Dictionary defines racism as any "belief that human races have distinctive make ups that determine their respective cultures, usually involving the idea that one 's own race is superior and has the right to rule others”( It becomes clearer and clearer how filled with criticism about this certain practice that Vonnegut's novel is. Again and again , does the word "Nigger " come up in the novel to underscore the harsh treatment blacks were forced to undergo , and it is used in a particular manner by Vonnegut to express again, how pathetic, blunt and almost funnily absurd this entire notion of discrimination towards blacks was. Vonnegut purposely generalizes opinions on blacks when saying how "White people were the only people with money enough to buy new automobiles, except for a few black criminals, who always wanted Cadillacs” (Vonnegut 41) . His striking generalities poke fun at those masses that discriminate...
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