Brandy Synopsis

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Synopsis
Case Study on Brandy
Objective:
* To make aware about the History of brandy
* To acquire knowledge about various types of Brandy
* To get to know about the process involved in Brandy manufacture * To come to know about various regions preparing Brandy
* To come to know about the Recipes of Cocktails made by using brandy

Introduction

Cognac brandy in a typical snifter.
Brandy (from brandywine, derived from Dutch brandewijn—"burnt wine") is a spirit produced by distilling wine. Brandy generally contains 35–60% alcohol by volume (70–120 US proof) and is typically taken as an after-dinner drink. Some brandies are aged in wooden casks, some are coloured with caramel colouring to imitate the effect of aging, and some brandies are produced using a combination of both aging and colouring.

Brandy is also produced from fermented fruits other than grapes, but these products are typically named eaux-de-vie, especially in French.
In some countries, fruit flavouring or some other flavouring may be added to a spirit that is called "brandy". Uses
Serving
Brandy may be served neat or on the rocks (over ice cubes). It may be added to other beverages to make several popular cocktails; these include the Brandy Alexander, the Sidecar, the Brandy Daisy, and the Brandy Old Fashioned.

In western countries, brandy is traditionally drunk neat at room temperature from a snifter or a tulip glass. In parts of Asia, it is usually drunk on the rocks.
When drunk at room temperature, it is often slightly warmed by holding the glass cupped in the palm or by gentle heating. Excessive heating of brandy may cause the alcohol vapour to become too strong, causing its aroma to become overpowering. Brandy drinkers who like their brandy warmed may ask for the glass to be heated before the brandy is poured. Culinary

* Flavoured brandy is added to enhance the flavour of desserts, including cake and pie toppings. * Flavoured brandy is commonly added to apple dishes.
* Brandy is a common deglazing liquid used in making pan sauces for steak and other meat. * Brandy is used to create a more intense flavour in some soups, notably onion soup. * Brandy is used to flambe the crepe suzette while serving. Medicinal

Brandy was an important ingredient in many patent medicines such as Daffy's Elixir.

History
The origins of brandy were clearly tied to the development of distillation. Concentrated alcoholic beverages were known in ancient Greece and Rome. Brandy, as it is known today, began to appear in the 12th century and became generally popular in the 14th century.

Initially wine was distilled as a preservation method and as a way to make it easier for merchants to transport. It is also thought that wine was originally distilled to lessen the tax which was assessed by volume. The intent was to add the water removed by distillation back to the brandy shortly before consumption. It was discovered that after having been stored in wooden casks, the resulting product had improved over the original distilled spirit. In addition to removing water, the distillation process led to the formation and decomposition of numerous aromatic compounds, fundamentally altering the composition of the distillate from its source. Non-volatile substances such as pigments, sugars, and salts remained behind in the still. As a result, the taste of the distillate was often quite unlike that of the original source.

As described in the 1728 edition of Cyclopaedia, the following method was used to distill brandy:
A cucurbit was filled half full of the liquor from which brandy was to be drawn and then raised with a little fire until about one sixth part was distilled, or until that which falls into the receiver was entirely flammable. This liquor, distilled only once, was called spirit of wine or brandy. Purified by another distillation (or several more), this was then called spirit of wine rectified. The second distillation was...
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