Branding Report Case Study Marmite

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Picture 1. Marmite art photography
10 December 2009

List of contents
* Main report pages:
* Abstract ……………………………….. p.3
* Introduction …………………………… p.3
* Brief history of Marmite …………….... p.3
* Marmite – a beautiful weed …………. p.4
* Method ………………………………… p.5
* Results ………………………………… p.5
* Love and Hate ……………….. p.5
* The century old logo ………… p.6
* Pitched by professionals ……. p.6
* Conclusions …………………………… p.7
* Visuals …………………………………. p.7 * Figure 1. ………………………. p.7
* Picture 1. ……………………… p.1
* Picture 2. ……………………… p.7
* Picture 3. ……………………… p.8
* Picture 4. ……………………… p.8
* Picture 5. ……………………… p.9
* Picture 6. ……………………… p.9
* Supplementary pages:
* Bibliography …………………………… p.10
* References ……………………………. p.10

Abstract
This report is going to look in depth of the reasons why Marmite is a successful brand. The long tradition of the product, the pioneer status, the original design, the brand disruption strategy cleverly established by top-notch agencies, all add up to the value of the iconic British brand. Introduction

Marmite as a brand has a particularly interesting identity. Unlike the majority of modern brands, which have overgone an extensive research before hitting the shelves, Marmite’s design has barely been changed throughout the whole existence of the brand. Furthermore, the century old logo proves to be efficient despite the fact that it contradicts with many of the contemporary design rules. Nowadays owned by the vast multi-brand concern Unilever, Marmite’s image is being further developed by top advertising and planning agencies, which skillfully modernize Marmite’s image without actually changing the main product. Brief history of Marmite

* Marmite was first introduced into the UK in 1902. Marmite is a nutritious, black, tasty, savoury spread enjoyable on toast or bread or even as a cooking ingredient. It is made from spent brewer’s yeast, that comes in a distinctive black jar with a yellow lid. * Before Louis Pasteur realised that cells contained within yeast were in fact living plants, people simply discarded this by-product of the brewing process. German scientist Liebig then went on to make yeast into a concentrated food product - one that resembled meat extract but was in fact vegetarian. * In 1902, the Marmite Food Company Limited was born and a small factory was opened in Burton-on-Trent. It took a couple of years to perfect the recipe and for the British public to warm to the spread's distinctive taste.  * Following the discover of vitamins in 1912, yeast was found to be a great source of five important 'B' vitamins. As a result Marmite was included in soldiers' ration packs during World War I. It became a dietary supplement in prisoner-of-war camps in World War II and was sent to British peacekeeping forces in Kosovo to boost morale in 1999. * Legend has it that the Marmite name may have derived from the famous French stew 'petite marmite'. A 'marmite' – pronounced 'mar-MEET' – is a French stockpot or cooking pot like the one shown on the jar, and shaped a bit like the jar itself. 

Marmite – a beautiful weed
There is no doubt that Marmite is one of the best known and most loved/hated brands in the UK. ‘ ‘Branding’ can be seen as the devolution of a set of core values to some or all of a person, company or thing’s products, assets and attributes, in the form of an identity. The identity can include the visual manifestation of these values, the embodiment of the desired personality, and can take many forms. Identity encompasses all the taxonomic aspects of a trademark – lettermark or logotype, picturemark, typefaces and colours. But it also involves the ethos, ambience and consumer perception surrounding the product.’ (Various authors, Branding From Brief to Finished Solution 2002 p.8) From the things...
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