Brand Switching

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AN ANALYSIS
OF
BRAND SWITCHING
BEHAVIOUR

SUBMITTED BY

ABSTRACT:
A proposed integrative approach measured consumer response to various incentives to switch brands. The response measure consisted of both actual behavior (i.e., switching behavior) and an evaluative measure, which underlies the behavior. Self-perception theory was utilized to assess consumer switching behavior in response to intrinsic versus extrinsic motives. The integrative approach was tested in the context of a multistage longitudinal field study concerning five product classes. Findings show that there is a difference depending upon whether switching behavior was induced by extrinsic (e.g., price, coupon) or intrinsic (e.g., a desire to try a new brand) incentives. Unlike intrinsically induced switching, extrinsic incentives motivated consumers to switch despite a high level of satisfaction with the last purchased brand. However, this switching behavior resulted in weaker intentions to repurchase the new brand.

INTRODUCTION

INTRODUCTION:
Consumer decision to purchase a product brand different from that previously or usually purchased. Brand switching can be instigated by price promotions, in-store displays, superior availability, perceived improvements or innovations in competitive brands, desire for novelty, number of available brands, perceived risk, frequency of purchase, changes in quality, or level of satisfaction with the most recent purchase. Brand switching is most common with products that have no great perceived variation in quality across brands such as bottled water, dairy products, or paper towels. brand loyalty. Sometimes known as brand jumping, brand switching is the process of choosing to switch from routine use of one product or brand to steady usage of a different but similar product. Much of the advertising process is aimed at encouraging brand switching among consumers, thus helping to grow market share for a given brand or set of brands. Convincing consumers to switch brands is sometimes a difficult task. It is not unusual for customers to build up a great deal of brand loyalty due to such factors as quality, price, and availability. To encourage switching brands, advertisers will often target these three areas as part of the strategy of encouraging brand switching. Price is often an important factor to consumers who are tight budgets. For this reason, advertisers will often use a price comparison model to entice long time users of one brand to try a new one. The idea is to convince the end user that it is possible to purchase the same amount of product while spending less money. Ideally, this means that the consumer can use the savings for other purchases, possibly even a luxury item of some sort. The idea of more discretionary resources in the monthly budget can be an effective in the encouragement of jumping brands.

OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY:
1. To find out the reason why consumers switch brands.
2. To analyse the frequency of switching the brands.
3. To analyse whether the brand switching behaviour of the customer is affected by marketing mix.

SCOPE OF THE STUDY:
1. To analyse the brand switching behaviour of the consumers. 2.

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

REVIEW OF LITERATURE:
The importance of customer value and brand switching are highlighted by combining these concepts in one study. The influences and antecedents of brand switching have been researched extensively. Brand switching is primarily attributed to an inherent variety drive referred to as ‘variety seeking’. This implies that sometimes the consumers do not evaluate the product characteristics when making a choice, they rather satisfy an inherent need for variety regardless of the product attributes of the objects switched to or from. Psychological variables influencing brand choice include preference, attitude, satisfaction and intention. Although the consumer evaluates objects...
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