Brand Sense

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Brand Sense Marketing in the 21st century is associated with how our senses affect the identification of brands and related consumer purchasing patterns. A global visionary, Lindstrom explains how these patterns connected with our five senses now give market dominance to product brands that capitalize on this information. His work is based on MillwardBrown's significant research study across four continents that explained how our five senses affect the establishment of brand dominance in the market. The main theory behind this book is that the future of brands is based primarily on the five senses, and the part they play in the emotional attachments between the brand and the consumer. An example is Singapore Airlines. This company scored high on smell due to the perfume that flight attendants use coupled with the hot towel aroma that pervades the plane cabins. This creates a unique emotional bond with this airline. No other airline brand even comes close, and Singapore Airlines is consistently rated as one of the top global airlines. Another example of the "sense" brand is the trademarked music for Nokia's phone rings, the largest cell phone manufacturer in the world. It is called the Nokia tune over the globe since so many recognize the tune and enjoy hearing it on their phones. Thus, an emotional sensory bond has been created between the consumer and Nokia's product. Lindstrom sets the stage in the beginning of the book (chapters 1-4) to explain the history of branding in the 20th century and how emotional branding came about in the 1960's. He lays the foundation for why Holistic Selling Proposition (HSP) brands are the trend for the 21st century. HSP brands have traditional characteristics as well as a type of religious sensory experience that many people are finding attractive in a post 9-11 world. The author discusses how advertising has occurred in a two dimensional world. He makes the argument that future brand strategies need to go to five dimensions...
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