Brand Personality

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Motivational research relies on depth interviews with individual consumers – this gives more in depth information but is time consuming and can be bias and subjective as its up to the researcher to interpret the findings with a small pool of people.

According to Table 4.2 (pg 112), a product with high sugar and energy represents a motive of power, masculinity and virility. This coincides with our target market of young males looking for energy and a kick start to charge themselves up for their busy and challenging day.

Motivational research is of considerable value because it offers a complete picture of potential customers' attitudes and behavioural patterns. It should be remembered, however, that the results are highly subjective and open to more than one interpretation. It is also expensive because it is time-consuming and can only be conducted by personnel trained in clinical psychology.

http://www.exporthelp.co.za/modules/7_researching_potential/implementing/shortlist/in_market_research/techniques/motivational.html

Motivation Research “represents the introduction into consumer or market research of new concepts drawn from the whole range of the social sciences, especially clinical psychology, sociology, and anthropology” (Gardner, 1959, p. 36).

Gardner, B.B. (1959), “The ABC of Motivation Research”, Business Topics, Vol. 7, pp. 35-41.

Motivation Research was used for product design, trade relations, training of salespeople, and store layout (Newman, 1957, p. 393); it was especially used by advertising agencies in stimulating creativity (Evans, 1957; Krugman, 1956-1957; Martineau, 1957, p. 8).

Newman, J.W. (1957), Motivation Research and Marketing Management, Harvard University Press, Boston.

Evans, F. (1957), “Motivation Research and Advertising Readership”, The Journal of Business, Vol. 30, pp. 141-146.

Krugman, H. (1956-1957), “An Historical Note on Motivation Research”, The Public Opinion Quarterly, Vol. 20, pp. 719-723....
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