Brainy Ballplayers: by Nick Bascom

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The author of this article basically asserts that whether a person be playing chess or tennis, the brain is utilized in a similar manner between aspects that require knowledge and the ones that seemingly don’t. In the article, elite athletes are used as examples to show how they easily use just as much brain power as the champion for professional checkers does. In athletics, the players need to be able to keep their A game, and get in the “zone”; in entering their zones, the brain manipulates a part of the brain to form the motions an athlete would normally do. People may think that sports require no brain activity, when in fact the brain is extremely active throughout an event, just using a different part of the wonderful brain. The author also discusses how athletes use the mirror system to mimic the actions of other pro athletes. The topic is practically about the way humans respond to the actuality of competition and athleticism. It, too, is a matter of what the athlete is feeling or thinking: a person’s emotional state can reflect the way he or she may play on the court, simply because of one’s ability to think over time or to over think the aspects of the game. Even though it may seem like the elite athletes have nothing going on upstairs, the brain is still in its active state and controls the way people respond, mimic, play sports. Nick Bascom states, “Superstar athletes are revered for their physical prowess, not for what goes on between their ears. And most postgame interviews do little to challenge the notion that athletes have more brawn than brains.” This means that whether on the court, field or course, the body depends on the brain for direction. But the brain is a busy taskmaster with duties beyond guiding motion, making it difficult to focus on that particular job. By examining how such brain processes lead to excellence in sports, as well as what goes wrong when athletes blow it in the big game, scientists think they can enhance training...
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