Brain - Psychology

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 107
  • Published : December 7, 2010
Open Document
Text Preview
The brain works together in a mysterious way. In 1981, it was discovered that the brain is actually split into two hemispheres, left and right. Each hemisphere of the brain processes information in its own unique way. Each side of the brain carries on it’s own set of task and duties it needs to accomplish, but at the same time, both parts still work together.

When deciding on which hemisphere I rely on the most, it can easily be said that I use the left-hemisphere more so than the right. I am a very analytical person who is constantly trying to analyze and solve problems that arise. I’m very keen to detail and usually don’t understand the overall picture at first, but rather all the small details that make it up. Not only am I good with details, I’m also great at mathematics and subjects that require a lot of analyzing and paying attention to detail.

The right hemisphere is what allows us to see the whole picture instead of the minor details. Even though the right hemisphere performs the simplest of task, if it is damaged, the person will not be able to recognize some aspects of speech. Looking back at my youth, I wasn’t really into solving puzzles or drawing, both of which the right hemisphere has domain over.

It was interesting to read about the different brain hemispheres and how they work together, or in the case of “split brains” against each other. “Split Brain” is an operation that can be done, in which the corpus callosum is cut to control severe epilepsy. After the operation, the person basically has two brains that function individually on their own. The brain is such a powerful tool that it is amazing to see how much complexity there is to it.

Coon, D., & Mitterer, J.O. (2010). Introduction to Psychology. Belmont,CA: Wadsworth Publishing.
tracking img