Bournemouth's Tourism

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  • Topic: Tourism, Dorset, Bournemouth
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  • Published : May 28, 2008
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The purpose of this report is to provide the reader with an in-depth analysis of the economic environment in which Bournemouth’s tourism industry take place. Furthermore, the negative and positive impacts of tourism in Bournemouth will be examined, as well as, recommendations will be given on how to develop effectively further tourism activities in the resort. It is very important to highlight that any tourism or economical statistics used in this report are not available online and were kindly provided by John Breakstone from the Market Research Group at Bournemouth University. In addition to that, the data obtained is from 2004 and does not only refer to Bournemouth on its own, but will cover all visitors staying in resorts within the Dorset county, such as Poole, Christchurch, Weymouth, Portland and of course, Bournemouth.

2.Background information
Along with the industrial revolution and the development of transports, people’s quality of life improved, leading to more disposable time. Therefore, resorts became very popular holiday destinations, especially into the 20th century. Bournemouth, by offering an improved and modern tourism product, is a strong sea-side

resort and with great potential for future developments.

Bournemouth is one of the most popular tourist resorts on the south coast of England, and it is home to over 151,000 people. In the 18th century, as an isolated, pine city, it attracted the wealthiest of societies from the whole world. The isolation did not last long as with the development of transports, the railway was permitted to approach the city. By 1890, Bournemouth was recognized by Queen Victoria. It gained the status of a Borough, and had its own Major. Its success did not stop there. By the middle of the 20th century, the city was one of the most important in England. In 1974, with a local reform, it became part of Dorset Council, and since 1997, it is now an independent local authority. Bournemouth has great characteristics such as, mild climate, 7 miles beach, and a wide variety of entertainment, accommodation and parks. Moreover, it is surrounded by some of the most enchanting countryside in Britain. In 2005 the resort won “four European Blue Flags and six Seaside Awards”, thanks to the cleanliness and safety of their beaches. It has also been recognized for having one of the highest recycling rates in the UK. Tourism is vital to Bournemouth- estimated annual tourist income of

£365.2m (source: Bournemouth Housing Strategy, 2002).
Consequently, commitment from local and national government, along with private sector support is crucial for the sustainable, long-term and prosperous development of the resort.

3. Tourism demand and client profiles
As mentioned before, during 18th and 19th centuries, Bournemouth was a relaxation place for the wealthiest. Nowadays, the resort is easily accessible and popular among holidaymakers. Various types of tourists are attracted to Bournemouth, from mass tourists to explorers. The key market for the resorts in the Dorset County is London and the South East as they send 35% of total visitors. There has been an increase in the number of overseas visitors, from 5% in 2001 to 7% in 2004. For further information see appendix 1, page…. But what has Bournemouth to offer to its visitors?

The resort has not only long beaches and pristine waters to offer, but also cultural heritages, great night-life, forests/ wild-life, festivals and events.

The following chart, extracted from the Bournemouth council website, show the purposes of the trips taken to the resort. Holiday924,00062%
Visits to friends/relatives215,00015%
Holiday is the main reason why tourists visit the area (62%). Holidaymakers can be classified as psychocentrics. They will be looking for familiar surroundings and packages holidays at a lower price....
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