Bourbon Orca

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By: Travis larson

She is the Bourbon Orca (known to others as AHTS DP2 supply vessel AX104 Ulsein Design AS.) christened June 24, 2006 in the city of Aesland, Norway. She will be running under the Norwegian flag and working in the North Sea under the DNV classification society. The Orca is portrayed as a great coalition of innovative minds from ODIM, Bourbon Offshore (being the owner and operator), deck side mates and AB’s, with Ulstein Verft AS being the recognized builder. ODIM, Bourbon and Ulstein all split the costs of construction. The Orca just over eighty-six meters in length, with a breadth just short of nineteen meters. Her draft at design is six meters with a working draft of around seven meters; her deadweight at maximum draft is thirty five hundred tons. She can handle twelve hundred tons of deck cargo on five hundred forty square meters at ten tons per meters. Not the largest ship but surely one of the most recognized up there, all four-thousand eighty-nine gross tons. When visiting,459, one must view the bottom videos to understand what a giant, and revolutionary collaboration this was, and how much pride was and is invested behind these new ground-breaking systems. They begin explaining how Norwegians have been respected for two-thousand years as master ship constructors, and how this company has been renowned for answering difficult trying requests for world leading ship solutions around the world. An interesting fact about Ulstein is that part of the group was sold to Vickers, which later was picked up by well respected Rolls Royce, all except the maritime sector. The Orca is environmentally friendly, cost effective, while also being inventively safe and comfortable. The first of its kind in many ways, she will be one of the most robust vessels in the OSV division. The first thing you will notice about the Bourbon Orca is her distinctive hull design, the blueprint of which began back in 2001 with construction taking a full four years. The Ulstein X-Bow in an inverted bow allows for less pitching, and therefore less sprays to the bridge (a little sea story later on will explain why this is so useful), a smoother, hushed, all around comfortable ride for all its crew. With a more level keel it is able to get better speeds in all weather conditions with less fuel consumption and even greater maneuverability. The reason this unconventional bow works is because it kind of acts like a snowshoe, but instead of surface area gently pressing on snow, its buoyancy tenderly gliding on waves once they are sliced at the water line. She can swing around on a dime thanks to the Bow tunnel thruster and the retractable bow rudder propeller. Tore Ulstein, the Chief Executive Officer of Design had this to say about the new hull. “Thinking outside the box is a credo at Ulstein Design, a credo that we work to translate into action. However it is not enough to dare to become involved and innovate with us. Bourbon Offshore Norway has shown us that it belongs to this group of pioneers, because it was immediately enthusiastic and participated with the completion of the innovative project.” The team wishes to interpret this design to every ship that will have a practical use for it. Any vessel they let sail with this design is getting record setting contracts. There first goals are to extend into the merchant and short sea sectors. They even go as far as to say that the design allows for better protection of cargo areas, and possibly even greater payload capacity. This may be the face of the shipping industry in the near future, with hundreds of new whips being drawn out and who knows how many coming to fruition. As of now the first X-BOW will be the air condition home for 34 people while they roam the North Sea positioning oil platforms. Fourteen of these sailors have singles, while the rest have doubles. Other accommodations...
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