Bottle Feeding an Infant

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 82
  • Published : February 18, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
Bottlefeeding an Infant
Pamela Joy
COM 340: Technical Writing
Professor Larry Sexton
September 6, 2010

OUTLINE:
I. Introduction – Bottlefeeding Infants
A. Definition of bottlefeeding
B. Background on infant formulas
C. Description of appropriate liquids to feed an infant from a bottle D. Purpose of bottle-feeding
II.
A. Equipment Needed for Bottlefeeding
1. nursing bottles
2. nipples
3. bottle brush
B. Preparing formula for Infant
1. Sanitary care
2. Using water from a well
a. Notify health department to test water
C. How to Bottlefeed
1. Holding your baby
2. Positioning the bottle
3. Knowing when your baby is full
4. Burping your baby after feeding \ spitting up
5. Switching arms when feeding
D. How much to feed
1. Body weight of infant
III. Conclusion
A. Summary of all findings

Brochure
Bottlefeeding an Infant

Bottlefeeding is a substitute for breast milk for feeding infants. Pediatricians advise breastfeeding (that is, breastfeeding with no formula) for a full-term, healthy infants for the first 6 months of life. However, many infants are formula-fed today, at least in part. Background on Formulas:

1. Milk-based formulas are prepared from cow milk with added vegetable oils, vitamins, minerals, and iron. These formulas are suitable for most healthy full-term infants. 2. Soy-based formulas are made from soy protein with added vegetable oils (for fat calories) and corn syrup and/or sucrose (for carbohydrate). These formulas are suitable for infants who cannot tolerate the lactose in most milk-based formulas or who are allergic to the whole protein in cow milk and milk-based formulas. 3. Special formulas are for low birth weight (LBW) infants, low sodium formulas for infants that need to restrict salt intake, and "predigested" protein formulas for infants who cannot tolerate or are allergic to the whole proteins (casein and whey) in cow milk and milk-based formulas (MedicineNet, 2010). Purpose of Bottlefeeding:

* An inadequate supply of maternal breast milk.
* Inefficient sucking by the baby.
* Inability to quantitate the precise amount of breast-milk received by the baby. * Concern about transferring drugs the mother may be taking for a medical problem through the breast milk to the infant. (Examples of medications that are considered unsafe for the baby include cimetidine, cyclophosphamide, lithium, gold salts, methotrexate, metronidazole, cyclosporine, and bromocriptine.) * Mother needs to work outside of the home shortly after the baby's delivery. Formula-feeding offers a practical alternative to trying to be in two places at once! (Formula-fed babies also need to eat less frequently than do breastfed babies because breast milk digests and leaves the stomach more quickly. Thus, breastfed babies become hungry more frequently.) (MedicineNet, 2010). Equipment Needed for Bottlefeeding:

* Nursing bottles with caps. 6 to 8 8-ounce bottles or fewer if you wash them more than once a day. You may choose reusable bottles or disposable bottles with sterile plastic liners. * Nipples. One for each bottle with a few spares. Those made of silicone will last longer. * A bottle brush and a nipple brush. (Martin and Lewis, 1994).

Preparing Formula for an Infant:
* Always wash your hands with soap and hot water before preparing baby's formula and bottles to prevent infection. * Use bottles, caps and nipples that have been washed in clean water and dishwashing soap or detergent or in the dishwasher if you have one. If you wash them by hand, use a bottle brush. Squeeze water through the nipple holes to be sure that they are open. Rinse well to remove all detergent, and let them stand in a rack to dry. (Check the package to see if they should be boiled before you use them the first time.) * If the formula you've chosen is canned, clean the top of the can with soap and...
tracking img