Botany Lab Report

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Botany Lab
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Introduction
This study observed the effects of different body fluids and solutions relative to breaking down bacteria, specifically in the human body. The enzymes we studied, lysozomes, help the body lyse, or break down bacteria by targeting peptidoglycan in bacterial walls. The solutions and fluids studied were saliva, mucus, tears, a stock solution of lysozomes, and distilled water. The solutions were placed in agar containing Micrococcus Luteus and we observed the amount of bacteria that was lyzed around them. The measurements were taken by observing where the agar cleared around the solutions, as the agar was cloudy where bacteria was present. I hypothesized that saliva would have the greatest effect, as the mouth is full of bacteria. I thought the stock solution would be the second most effective, as it is a simple solution of lysozomes. I predicted that Mucus would be third, as the nose has a similar environment to the mouth, and tears would be less effective, as I saw them as more of a lubricant than a lysing solution. I thought that distilled water would observe no effect as it has no lysozomes. -------------------------------------------------

Methods
The class, which was previously separated into groups of around four people each, was distributed pitre dishes containing agar with freeze-dried Micrococcus Luteus cells for testing. Each group was also given a micropipetter, distilled water, paper discs for marking purposes (all courtesy of the Millsaps College Botany Lab) and a stock solution (containing 1 mg of lysozomes per ml, provided by Carolina Biological in Burlington, NC). The individual groups had to produce the other three solutions, mucus, saliva, and tears, to be tested in the agar. Each of the five solutions (distilled water, stock solution, saliva, mucus, and tears) were measured to 20 microliters and placed on the paper discs which were color coded in order to keep notes...
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