Boston Tea Party

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December 3rd, 2011
The Boston Tea Party
The Boston Tea Party made a change in history, a rebellion that has a cause and effect. It was a cold December night in Boston. There were three famous ships, the Dartmouth, the Eleanor, and the Beaver were sitting in Boston harbor, their holds full of tea that wasn’t being unloaded because of the angry residents of Boston were threatened not to buy or use the tea.

The government of Great Britain had passes the Tea Act, a law that almost guaranteed that the American colonists would buy tea from the East India Company. The law lowered the price on tea, resulting the East India Companies so much that it was the cheapest tea around. The price was so low that even other tea companies were shocked. This was beneficial to them because if American colonists were looking for way to cut down costs and save money, they would much rather choose a cheaper tea over the expensive one, in this case were the merchants.

The law came out because the East India Company weren’t doing well and the British government wanted to help the company get back on its feet.
Other tea companies weren't happy about the Tea Act, but the American colonists viewed it as another example of "taxation without representation": In effect, the Tea Act was putting a tax on tea sold by companies other than the East India Company. As with the Stamp Act and other unpopular taxes, they were all voted in by Parliament, which was thousands of miles away, and the American colonists had no way to influence the law or speak out against it while it was being debated in government. So the colonists were angry. They wanted to do something else to let the British know about the unhappiness that the Tea Act was causing. Some people wanted to keep things nonviolent; others wanted bloodshed. The result was somewhere in the middle. A group of colonists determined to make things change was the Sons of Liberty. Led by patriots as Samuel Adams and John Hancock, the Sons of...
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