Born in East L.A.

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Born in East L.A.

We watched Born in East L.A. for our in class movie. I enjoyed it a lot. I’ve never seen this movie, which is surprising because I’ve seen most movies with Cheech in it. Although the movie was humorous, there were a lot of political issues embedded within and some of the issues are even present today, even though the movie was made in 1987.

I thought the situation when Rudy gets deported is kind of shocking actually. I know it’s meant to be funny, but things like this happen more than we realize. It’s pretty funny how immigration determine if he’s an illegal or not by asking him who the president is. You would think that they should do bit better analysis especially when they hear Rudy speak English so well.

I can relate to Rudy in certain situations. When he gets on the deportation bus with the rest of the illegals, they all look down on him because he doesn’t speak Spanish and call him a “pocho.” Because I am of Mexican descent and don’t speak Spanish, I often find myself in the same situation as Rudy. But, like Rudy, I couldn’t help it. My parents don’t speak Spanish and I was born and raised in America speaking only English.

One more interesting thing that happened toward the end of the movie, is when Rudy finally gets back to L.A. and they are in the middle of a Cinco de Mayo parade and his girlfriend asks what it is. It is really interesting how Cinco de Mayo is only celebrated in the U.S. and in the city of Puebla in Mexico. It’s surprising how big that holiday is in America. Maybe it’s because so many people here think it’s actually Mexican Independence Day, which is actually in September.

These are some of the points that stood out for me in this movie. There were a lot more, but I think it would take a second screening of the movie to catch it all. Overall, I enjoyed the movie and I’ll probably see it again.
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