Boost Juice in Germany

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International Human Resources
Assessment 2 – Group Presentation
Boost Juice Expatriate Program Challenges in Germany
March 23, 2010

Authors:
SindooraNiranjan, 110024230
Maggie Sinclair, 110058024
Kai Zhi Lee, 100111728
Ke Yu, 100070856
Harnie Kumaraguru, 110026969

Word count: 1105 (excluding external referencing)

Introduction
The concept of Boost brand was created in 1998 when the founder, Janine Allis, realized the fashion of the juice bar when on holidays in the United States. She researched the growing demand and found a huge market opportunity for a healthy fast food alternative in Australia. The first boost juice bar was formed in 2000 located in Adelaide (Boost Juice 2011). The company has expanded internationally with 200 stores in Asia, Europe, and the Middle East through the way of Franchising. This report will analyse and discuss various potential human resource issues when considering the deployment of an Expatriate to Germany to support expansion. In particular, the issues faced by the organization within the five arenas of recruitment and selection, training and development, cross-culture, performance management, and compensation.

1.1 Expatriate Recruitment & Selection
Involvement of the expatriate’s spouse in any pre-assignment, on-assignment and post-assignment training and support, particularly in language and cultural training (Salas et al. 2006; Shen 2005; Morgan et al. 2004; Scholes 2003; Mendenhall & Stahi 2000, Yavas & Bodur 1999) is essential. A spouse’s attitude and predisposition can influence the willingness of a dual-career expatriate to accept international assignments. Expatriates are less likely to agree to relocate and/or experience higher failure rates if experiencing these family stresses. (Harvey 1997; Andreason 2008). In order to prevent expatriate failure, Boost must select candidate with high emotional intelligence (EI) and personality characteristics of openness and sociability (Jassawalla, Truglia & Garvey 2004; Caligiuri 2000, Yavas & Bodur 1999). Conducting behavioural interviews will be deemed suitable to determine the EI of candidate (Goleman 2004, Truglia & Garvey 2004). 1.2 Recruitment and Selection in Germany

Another challenge Boost Australia will have in selecting the right expatriate is choosing a candidate that will have the ability to adjust existing recruitment and selection processes to German Culture. Boost shall recruit older, preferably female employees (Thevenon & Horko 2009) or foreign migrants (Royle 1999) instead of usual young and energetic employees (Datamonitor 2008) as German youngsters under age 21 are rarely involved in unskilled employment due to its structured regulation and training culture (Roberts, Clark & Wallace 1994). KSAs (knowledge, skills & ability) but not psychometric tests shall be used in selection process because German may perceive latter as violation of privacy and inaccurate performance predictor (Steiner & Gilliland 1996; Papalexandris & Panayotopoulou 2004). 2.1 Training and Development

Training and developing expatriates in areas of language skills, cross-cultural training, company policies and general skills related to the host country, before sending them abroad for their placements, would prove to be greatly beneficial for both the expatriates and the organization (McCaughey & Bruning 2005; Mayrhofer & Scullion 2002; Global Relocation Services 2004). It will support cross-cultural adjustment by increasing the awareness of the norms and behaviours appropriate to the host country and provide the skills for the expatriate to operate more effectively in the unfamiliar host culture (Caliguri 2002; McCaughey & Bruning 2005). As well, support the challenge of coping with differences in lifestyle and language barriers while living and working in Germany (Sims & Schraeder 2004; Welch 2003). Additionally, providing them...
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