Book Summary

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Book Summary

Beginning chapter one with citing one of the ten commandments, “Thou shall not steal,” Wayne Grudem sets the stage of what is about to come; a black and white analysis on how having business success does not necessarily make you fall short of being a “good” Christian. As a well-known, very credible Christian theologist, one may wonder why Grudem would venture out to right a book solely about business. “Business for the Glory of God,” looks at business ownership, profitability, money, competition, and borrowing and lending, just to name a few topics. This essay will take a look at a few of the controversial topics, and share insight of why they may or may not be feasible arguments for why business is, “a gift from God.”

When Grudem speaks of the commandment that states, “Thou shall not steal,” he uses this as evidence that by stealing, one must have their own possessions, and if we did not have possessions, this commandment would make no sense. This is a reasonable assumption, therefore it can be a good way to begin discussing how ownership is not so bad; on the contrary, if Grudem is unable to offer clear, factual information, his credibility may waiver. Chapter one continues with Grudem’s discussion of how ownership is not synonymic for greed, and if one is selfless and realizes that God is the real business owner, he has not sinned.

The points that Grudem makes are quite valid, and are very simple, and to the point; the issue with this, is that these may seem like simple subjects, however the responses are more analytical than what is given. When speaking of ownership, the only viewpoint is one attempting to prove that business ownership is not a sinful act; without overcoming specific objections that this may be a sinful act. While the writer makes valid arguments, he tends to only cater to what he believes, instead of being philosophical on the subject. This can lead to the reader questioning the content being read, and frankly can lead...
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