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Book Review for Trail of Tears: the Rise and Fall of the Cherokee...

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Book Review for Trail of Tears: the Rise and Fall of the Cherokee Nation by John Ehle

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  • June 20, 2011
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Book Review
Trail of Tears
The authors’ name of the book called Trail of Tears: The Rise and Fall of the Cherokee Nation is John Ehle. Trail of Tears was published in the United States by Anchor Books, a division of random house, New York and in Canada. This book was published in September 22, 1989. This book has 424 pages. John Ehle is more than qualified to write on this subject. He has wrote over seventeen books, his first book was published in 1957 so he has over 30 years of experience to write this book. He has had two books adapted into a film, The Winter People and The Journey of August King. He has 11 books of fiction and 6 books of non-fiction mostly involving subjects of the Civil Rights struggle, the trials of the Cherokee Nation, French wine and cheese, and Irish whiskey. His books are so important they have been asked to be written in 6 and more other languages. There is a lot of good feedback about this book such as Wall Street Journal’s comment, “Mr. Ehle’s powerful book peels back layer after layer of historical intricacy.” Also, according to the New York Newsday, this book is “beautifully written and emotionally mature book... a must.” The book title is about The Trail of Tears which was the forced relocation and movement of Native Americans, including many members of the Cherokee, Creek, Seminole, and Choctaw nations among others in the United States, from their homelands to Indian Territory in the Western United States. Many died in the relocation from diseases and starvation. This book talks more about the Cherokee nation than the Trail of Tears. He mostly talks about how the Cherokee nation was treated unfairly by the United States. It’s main focus is on the Treaty Party, consisting of Ridge, his son John Ridge, and his nephews Elias Boudinot and Stand Watie. According to the book The People: a history of native America, the Cherokee removal consisted of the Treaty Party vs. the Ross Party....