Bonobos and Chimps

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The bonobo is an in interesting species because it shares more than 98 percent of our genetic profile, which makes it very close to a human. It is believed that the human line of ancestry, along with the line of bonobo and chimpanzee, split about eight million years ago ( The bonobo is closely related to the chimpanzee but it is considered to be a different species (pygmy chimpanzee). When one looks at a bonobo, they may think that it looks a lot like a chimpanzee; however, if one takes a closer look, they will notice that the bonobo has longer legs, a higher forehead, and a different face shape (Relethford, Pg. 281). When it comes to the way of living, bonobos and chimpanzees differ as well. The bonobos will resolve any issue with sex, as it is the key to their social life. In order to avoid confrontation, or to make peace, bonobos will become sexually aroused very easily and they show their excitement in different mounting positions and touching of the genitals ( Although they live in groups that include both females and males, the females are the ones that contain the stronger bond and are the most dominant (Relethford, Pg. 282). Bonobo females will give birth to one infant about every five years and their pregnancies last around eight months. The infant will depend on its mother for the first four years of its life and during those first years, the father and any other siblings are closely associated with their family ( Chimpanzee:

The chimpanzee is the best known of the nonhuman primates. The chimpanzee has longer arms than legs, is both arboreal and terrestrial animals and also walks on its knuckles. Language and tool making was once thought to be unique to humans; however, observations have shown that chimpanzees have their own language and can also make tools. When it comes to family structure, chimpanzees will associate with their mothers until after they are...
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