Bombay Stock Exchange

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Bombay Stock Exchange
The Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE) (Marathi: Bombay Śhare Bāzaār) (formerly, The Stock Exchange, Bombay) is a stock exchange located in Dalal Street, Mumbai and is the oldest stock exchange in Asia. The Bombay Stock Exchange has the largest number of listed companies in the world, with 4990 listed as of August 2010. As of December 2010, the equity market capitalization of the companies listed on the BSE was US$1.63 trillion, making it the 4th largest stock exchange in Asia and the 9th largest in the world.[1] It has also been cited as the world's best performing stock market. With over 5,034 Indian companies listed and over 7700 scrips on the stock exchange, the Bombay Stock Exchange has a significant trading volume. The BSE SENSEX (Sensitive index), also called the "BSE 30", is a widely used market index in India and Asia. Though many other exchanges exist, BSE and the National Stock Exchange of India account for the majority of the trading in shares in India. The hours of operation for the BSE quoted above are stated in terms the local time (i.e. GMT +5:30) in Mumbai , India. BSE's normal trading sessions are on all days of the week except Saturdays, Sundays and holidays declared by the Exchange in advance.[

History of Bombay Stock Exchange

The Phiroze Jeejeebhoy Towers house the Bombay Stock Exchange since 1980. The Bombay Stock Exchange is the oldest exchange in Asia. It traces its history to the 1850s, when 4 Gujarati and 1 Parsi stockbroker would gather under banyan trees in front of Mumbai's Town Hall. The location of these meetings changed many times, as the number of brokers constantly increased. The group eventually moved to Dalal Street in 1874 and in 1875 became an official organization known as 'The Native Share & Stock Brokers Association'. In 1956, the BSE became the first stock exchange to be recognized by the Indian Government under the Securities Contracts Regulation Act. The Bombay Stock Exchange developed the BSE Sensex in 1986, giving the BSE a means to measure overall performance of the exchange. In 2000 the BSE used this index to open its derivatives market, trading Sensex futures contracts. The development of Sensex options along with equity derivatives followed in 2001 and 2002, expanding the BSE's trading platform. Historically an open outcry floor trading exchange, the Bombay Stock Exchange switched to an electronic trading system in 1995. It took the exchange only fifty days to make this transition. This automated, screen-based trading platform called BSE On-line trading (BOLT) currently has a capacity of 8 million orders per day. The BSE has also introduced the world's first centralized exchange-based internet trading system, to enable investors anywhere in the world to trade on the BSE platform. The BSE is currently housed in Phiroze Jeejeebhoy Towers at Dalal Street, Fort area

BSE indices

For the premier stock exchange that pioneered the securities transaction business in India, over a century of experience is a proud achievement. A lot has changed since 1875 when 318 persons by paying a then princely amount of Re. 1, became members of what today is called Bombay Stock Exchange Limited (BSE). Over the decades, the stock market in the country has passed through good and bad periods. The journey in the 20th century has not been an easy one. Till the decade of eighties, there was no measure or scale that could precisely measure the various ups and downs in the Indian stock market. BSE, in 1986, came out with a Stock Index-SENSEX- that subsequently became the barometer of the Indian stock market. The launch of SENSEX in 1986 was later followed up in January 1989 by introduction of BSE National Index (Base: 1983-84 = 100). It comprised 100 stocks listed at five major stock exchanges in India - Mumbai, Calcutta, Delhi, Ahmedabad and Madras. The BSE National Index was renamed BSE-100 Index from October 14, 1996 and since then, it...
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