Bombardier Aerospace Company Report

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BOMBARDIER AEROSPACE

Team 3 Project Report

COMM 210/CA – Summer 2009

Amine Benasla
Camila Fitzgibbon

Luxi Zeng

Qi Zhang
Yuan Yuan Zhu

Concordia University

John Molson School of Business

Table of Contents

1. Introduction……………………………………………………………………………3 2. Growth Phase and Vision……………………………………………………………....5 3. Innovation and Strategy………………………………………………………………..7
3.1. Key to Success……………………………………………………………….7
3.2. Innovation……………………………………………………………………8
3.3. Strategy……………………………………………………………………....9 4. Sigmoid Curve………………………………………………………………………..10 5. Picking People………………………………………………………………………...11 6. Social Responsibility………………………………………………………………….12

6.1. J. Armand Bombardier Foundation………………………………………...13
6.2. Culture Contribution………………………………………………………..13
6.2. Education Contribution……………………………………………………..14
6.4. Employment Concentration………………………………………………...14 7. Conclusion………………………………………………………………………….....15 Appendix
References………………………………………………………………………………17

1. Introduction

Bombardier is a global corporation founded in Quebec by Joseph-Armand Bombardier and headquartered in Canada. The company is a leading manufacturer of business jets, regional aircraft, trains, snowmobiles, and small watercraft worldwide. With 80,000 employees, and 19.7 billion dollars (US) in gross revenues (at the end of fiscal year in January 2009), it is evident that Bombardier has a relevant role in international business and is a major asset to the Canadian economy. The primary focus of this project is Bombardier Aerospace (BA), which accounts for over half of the company's revenue and is today the world’s third largest civil aircraft manufacturer. The acquisition of four companies (Canadair, Short Brother, Learjet, Havilland Aircraft) during 1986 and 1992, established its main frame. Nowadays, Bombardier Aerospace’s segment is present in 22 countries and is comprised of an international workforce of over 28,000 (approximately 17,000 of those being high-skilled professionals located in Canada). Bombardier’s commercial aircraft portfolio of products is comprised of regional jets and turboprop aircraft, which include the CRJ700/CRJ900/CRJ1000 NextGen regional jets and Q400 NextGen turboprops. What is also noteworthy is that Bombardier’s shares are traded on the Toronto Stock Exchange, not to mention that it is also listed as an index component to the Dow Jones Sustainability World and North America indexes.

The numbers are impressive, but it’s important to recognize how difficult it has been for Bombardier Aerospace to become the powerhouse that it is today. Evidence will demonstrate that the organization has overcome crucial periods of crisis, and that having to face such times of difficulties has only made them stronger than ever before. As we look through the past and present activities of Bombardier, we understand that the aircraft-manufacturing company has been indeed successful, but that in such a turbulent, unstable, and volatile market it will require hard work to become bigger and better or to even to sustain its own survival in the future.

The claim, therefore, lies in the idea that Bombardier Aerospace will continue to be successful in spite of economic downturns and harsh competition that it may confront throughout its lifetime, as long as it maintains its focus on a few crucial concepts.

2. Growth Phase and Vision

With the backup of the aviation history and the expertise of the four acquired manufactories, Bombardier Aerospace set up a goal: to develop fifteen new aircraft models in fifteen years. The company then leveraged the existing skills and resources of each manufacturer to help the plan work smoothly. According to Greiner’s “five phases of growth” theory, Bombardier Aerospace was in the creativity phase at that time. For BA, as long as their goal was fulfilled, they didn’t mind to keep working in the entrepreneurial way. However, as each manufactory started to work...
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