Bohlander/Snell-Managing Hr

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Managing Human Resources, 14e, Bohlander/Snell - © 2007 Thomson South-Western

© STONE/GETTY IMAGES

chapter

15

International Human Resources Management
After studying this chapter, you should be able to
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Identify the types of organizational forms used for competing internationally.

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5 6 7 8

Identify the unique training needs for international assignees and their employees.

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Explain the economic, politicallegal, and cultural factors in different countries that HR managers need to consider.

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Identify the characteristics of a good international compensation plan.

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Explain how domestic and international HRM differ.

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Reconcile the difficulties of home- and host-country performance appraisals.

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Discuss the staffing process for individuals working internationally.

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Explain how labor relations differ around the world.

PART 6

Expanding Human Resources Management Horizons

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Managing Human Resources, 14e, Bohlander/Snell - © 2007 Thomson South-Western

640

PART 6

Expanding Human Resources Management Horizons

W

hen you pick up a newspaper or turn on the TV, you’ll notice that stories are constantly being told about companies competing globally. These stories might include mergers of U.S. and international companies, such as Daimler-Benz and Chrysler a few years ago. Or they might highlight companies expanding into other markets, such as Starbucks in Asia or Wal-Mart in Mexico. Or the stories might focus on international companies gaining dominance here in the United States, such as Sony or Toyota. “No matter what kind business you run, no matter what size you are, you’re suddenly competing against companies you’ve never heard of all around the world that make a very similar widget or provide a very similar service,” as one global manager put it. In fact, nearly threequarters of HR professionals from companies large and small in a wide range of industries and countries say they expect their company’s international business to grow in the coming years.1 Some of these companies are handling the challenge well. Others are failing miserably as they try to manage across borders. More often than not, the difference boils down to how people are managed, the adaptability of cultures, and the flexibility of organizations.

Up until this point in the book, we have emphasized HRM practices and systems as they exist in the United States. This is not so much an oversight on our part as it is a deliberate decision to explain the HR practice in the most fundamental manner possible. Nonetheless, the topic of international HRM is so important that we wanted to dedicate an entire chapter to its discussion. In this chapter we will observe that much of what has been discussed throughout this text can be applied to international operations, provided one is sensitive to the requirements of a particular international setting. USING THE INTERNET The first part of this chapter presents a brief introduction to international business firms. In many important respects, the way a company The Society for Human Resource organizes its international operations influences the type of managerial and Management Global Forum human resources issues it faces. In addition, we briefly describe some of the provides current news updates on environmental factors that also affect the work of managers in a global setissues concerning HRM from ting. Just as with domestic operations, the dimensions of the environment around the world. Go to the form a context in which HRM decisions are made. A major portion of this Student Resources at: chapter deals with the various HR activities involved in the recruitment, http://bohlander.swlearning.com selection, development, and compensation of employees who work in an international setting.

Managing across Borders
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A domestic firm that uses its...
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