Body Modification

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body modification

1. In Class we watched several documentaries such as Covered: Women and Tattoos, Modify, Flesh and Blood and Hori Smoku: Sailor Jerry. As we compare these documentaries we can agree, all have to do with Body Art Modification. Just the styles of how the body is modified and how the contrast of type of art is different and who the art is being focused on. In Covered the main objective is to present the experience of heavily tattooed women: their love of ink, their imagery selection, and their experiences of prejudice from strangers, family, employers, and impacts of media representations. In Covered you will see a macro-sociological approach to understanding heavily tattooed women in society as they struggle with gender norms, employment discrimination, family rejection, and social stigma. Modify Introduces viewers to people who've explored branding, piercing, tattooing, tongue splitting and every type of body modification imaginable. This documentary comprehends the thoughts of artists and their human canvases to reveal how and why they've gone to such extremes to express themselves. The way these two films compare is where for some people their own bodies have become a canvas. Getting tattooed is a wonderful way for ones total expression. How the two films contrast is in Covered only shows woman getting tattooed and no other type of modification while Modify goes into all types of artistic body modification.

2. In class it was mentioned the fact culture is inscribed on the body. I agree with this statement because we have seen culture tattooed onto millions of people’s bodies explaining a story about themselves. Examples of culture inscribed onto the bodies such as criminals behind bars where they would get a tattoo describing what type of crime they committed. Also you could see tattoos on Polynesians like describing if they were a warrior or a healer. Another form of culture on the body would be the full body suits you would see on the ranks of its members of the Japanese Yakuza. All these inscriptions would display different types of culture by what you see on their bodies.

3. Cultural Relativism can be defined as the view that moral or ethical systems, which vary from culture to culture, as the bedrock of discipline, belief that no culture is superior to another. This is based on the idea that there is no ultimate standard of good or evil, so every judgment about right and wrong is a product of society. Therefore, any opinion on morality or ethics is subject to the cultural perspective of each person. Ultimately, this means that no moral or ethical system can be considered the “best,” or “worst,” and no particular moral or ethical position can actually be considered “right” or “wrong.” An example of what cultural relativists might believe is that the rights of people, in paticular women and girls are relative to where they are born, "their" cultures and religions. As a result, cultural relativism supports and maintains sexual misconduct and violence against women in Islam-stricken societies like Iran because it is "their culture and religion" and it creates ghettoized, regressive "minority" communities in the West where women and girls continue to face inferiority and Islamic laws and customs.

4. In Surgery Junkies, Pitts-Taylor discusses the concept of cosmetic wellness and life style medicine. Cosmetic wellness which means the tending and improvement of the outer body is coded as signifying a healthy inner self. Lifestyle medicine is defined as the application of environmental, behavioral, medical and motivational principles to the management of lifestyle-related health problems in a clinical setting. Feminists have critiqued as the medicalization of beauty also a much broader shift toward lifestyle medicine. In postmodern society beyond the focus on health has dramatically expanded to include maintenance, lifestyle and appearance, while transforming the...
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