Bmi and Physical Fitness of the Students

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BMI & PHYSICAL FITNESS PERFORMANCE OF THE BPE STUDENTS

Chapter 1
Introduction to the Study

Chapter one is divided into five parts; namely: (1) Background and Theoretical Framework of the Study, (2) Statement of the Problem and the Hypothesis, (3) Significance of the Study, (4) Definition of Terms, and (5) Scope of Delimitation of the Study. Part One, Background and Theoretical Framework of the Study, presents the rationale for the choice of the problem and presents the Theoretical Framework upon which this study was anchored. Part Two, Statement of the Problem and the Hypothesis, enumerates the general and specific questions answered in the study and states the hypothesis tested. Part Three, Significance of the Study, identifies the beneficiaries and benefits that could be derived from the results of the study. Part Four, Definitions of Terms, gives the conceptual and operational meanings of the important terms used in the study. Part Five, Scope and Delimitation of the Study, specifies the coverage and limitations of the study.

Background and Theoretical Framework of the Study

The human body is a perfect work of art for its symmetry & proportion. It can handle innumerable tasks ranging from the light to heavy up to the simple to intricate one wayback prehistoric times. The interest of man towards the “human body” was been the subject of several investigations as documented by paintings & carvings on caves and other relics as collected by scientists. This curiosity of man towards this human body as a perfect work of art resulted to continuous & progressive studies causing this to sprout new fields like medicine and sports physiology. Several field of specialization focused on physical performance like altering individual natural speed and other biomotor abilities; while others classified and categorize the human body as to mesomorph, endomorph and octomorph. From this, Body Mass Index (BMI) became popular in the field of physical education. Body mass index (BMI) process involves simple arithmetical manipulation to obtain the measurements ratio of weight to the square of height for determining if a person is overweight (between 25kg/m2 to 30 kg/m2) or obese (over 30kg/m2), as per World Health Organization standards for adults. As Asian populations develop negative health consequences at a lower BMI than Caucasians, some nations like Japan has redefined obesity as any BMI greater than 25kg/m2, while China uses a BMI greater than 28kg/m2. Filipinos, being a variance of an oriental race, with almost the same physical description as our Japanese and Chinese counterparts, are highly advised to espouse the BMI ranges for Asians. The lowest normal should be 17.9 kg/m2 for men and 15.0 kg/m2 for women according to some experts. To find somebody's BMI, first measure their weight (body mass in kilograms), secondly measure their height in meters and finally divide their weight by the square of their height. Physical fitness is “the ability to handle the task performed in everyday life with enough energy in reserve to enjoy leisure pursuits and deal with emergencies” (Safrit, 1995). Pate (1983), proposed a more appropriate definition of fitness as “the capacity of the heart, blood vessels, lungs, and muscles to function at optimum efficiency.” According to Dotson (1988), physical fitness is a state of well-being that allows people to perform daily activities with vigor, reduce risk of health problems, and participate in a variety of physical activities. (Foundations of Physical Fitness, Piamonte et al., 2006) Physical fitness is but only one aspect of total fitness. Total fitness is the optional quality of life. The highest quality of life includes intellectual, social, spiritual, and physical components. Mental alertness and curiosity, emotional feelings, meaningful relations with other humans, awareness of and involvement in...
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