Blood Pressure and the Heart

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Abstract:
In this report you will learn of how my group and I performed our lab on blood pressure and what the results mean. We found the blood pressure before and after sixty seconds of jogging in place to see the effects. We found that after the physical activity the subject’s blood pressure was higher. From this we take away that physical activity does have a significant effect on the heart and blood pressure. Background:

Blood pressure is the measured force applied to the artery walls as the heart pumps. It is determined by the amount of force and the quantity of blood being pumped by the heart. Many factors play a role in determining your blood pressure. Your age, gender, weight, sex, height, whether you smoke, and genetics are all factors.

Blood pressure is measured in two parts. There systolic pressure which is the pressure on the arteriole wall when the heart contracts. And the diastolic pressure which is the pressure on the arteriole walls when the heart relaxes, between contractions. Blood pressure is typically measured in mm Hg. The systolic and diastolic pressure is represented in a fraction with the systolic in the numerator and the diastolic in the denominator.

This being said it is commonly known that when you are doing physical activity your heart must work harder and faster to pump blood out to your body. The mean arterial pressure is used to measure the adequacy of blood getting to the organs and vital tissues. When we take this there should be an increase from resting to after physical activity, because the heart is pumping harder to deliver all that is needed to the body.

Hypothesis:
If one jogs in place for sixty seconds there will be an increase in blood pressure measurements. Materials and Method:
• Computer with Vernier Logger Pro® software
• Vernier LabQuest Mini® with USB cable
• Vernier Blood Pressure Sensor
• Graph paper
• Watch, clock, or timer
• Laboratory Journal...
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