Blood Loading

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Lance’s Roll in Blood Doping
The controversy of Lance Armstrong doping has its analysts, supporters and critics. I agree that what he did was wrong and goes against the ethics of competition and degrades the integrity for those of us who hold the title of an athlete. This opinion coincides with the general thought of the public. But what I have found is that most people are ignorant and naive as to why the doping Lance did is degrading to cycle racing. The degrading of the sport and its proud and noble community that worships it. The main argument people use to back the crucifixion of Lance is and his actions is pretty cut and dry. Doping is illegal and gives the racer speed, strength and endurance that he or she would otherwise not naturally have. While, yes this is true, others may use the argument that all the tier one competitors were doping so the playing field was fare. While this may sound true, there has been much science and research done by scientist that can gives us an understanding on how doping effects the human body and its performance. “We have been in communication with Mr. Armstrong and his representatives, and we understand that he does want to be part of the solution and assist in the effort to clean up the sport of cycling,” Travis Tygart, chief executive of the agency, said in a statement. Blood doping, or blood loading, was first used in the U.S. Special Forces in 1993. There are many forms of loading blood, but the military used a technique were they would take two units of blood from a solider, and then concentrate the two units into one. What that would do is make that single unit twice as high in red blood cell count. Then when the time came, a few hours before a mission, they would swap that same solders blood with this new concentrate. Military scientists believe that the procedure increases the soldier’s endurance and alertness because of the increase in the blood's capability to carry oxygen. “All is fare in love and war. What we...
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