Blink

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Name: Maridel Banco Date: 11/22/13 Period: 2 Book Title: Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking Genre: Psychology/Self-Help Author: Malcolm Gladwell Number of Pages: 286

Brief Summary and “Arrangement” of the Book:
Malcom Gladwell published the most pleasant book, “Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking,” which he extended the landmark style of his number one international bestseller The Tipping Point. Gladwell transformed the ideas of how people understand the world within its rapid decisions. The Blink is about the power of thinking without thinking, which choices that seem to be made in instant decisions in the blink of an eye of a person that can’t be as simple as it may seem to be. Blinked discussed the many elements that affect the individuals judgments, culture, and even their experienced, in which told how they can be improved. Gladwell states various reasons and examples why the human brain is necessary to make a correct decision without thinking and examine information that is necessary to choose a course of action, which he termed this ability as “thin-slicing.” The “Blink” is structured starting with an advantageous introduction, followed by several chapters, conclusion, and extra-textual elements such as the afterword, author’s notes, index, and ended with a special section of a reading group guide. Introduction. The Statue that Didn’t Look Right- The author begins by introducing the concept of immediate reactions to people whether it’s physical or emotional responses. Therefore, Gladwell’s story relates to a particular type of a statue by the J. Paul Getty Museum in California, which was known as a kouros. He proceeds to explain the questioning of the statue and to ascertain the truth of how owners maintain the museum to stay open in public. Although the museum faced several conflicts, it was proven that the ownership documents were forged, and yet the museum reopened. Chapter I. “The Theory of Thin Slices: How a little Bit of Knowledge Goes a Long Way”: The first chapter accounted how Gladwell introduces the main concept of the “thin-slice,” detailing the way people’s minds can make brisk decision and yet make judgments as well. He employs different concepts to illustrate the individuals within their power of thinking without thinking, in providing an example of married couples. By watching videotapes of married couples, the research team began to specify a system that reveals many deep-seated problems in the marriage through their body language patterns and gestures. Chapter II. “The Locked Door: The Secret Life of Snap Decisions”: The context of this chapter discusses the story of how most of the time, we create snap judgments unconsciously and make quick decisions from it. The author explains the different experiment that was done to help prove his reasoning by the students who participated in small tests. This can encourage us to rethink of how certain we are with our thoughts. Gladwell also demonstrates how humans seem to be naturally ill at ease with ambiguity, so we unconsciously create stories that account for decisions we make or within our actions. Chapter III. “The Warren Harding Error: Why We Fall for Tall, Dark, Handsome Men”: This chapter consists of the impact of the Warren Harding error, which has the negative side to rapid thinking and it affects the accuracy of the way we make fast decisions. Due to this error, people can cause others to create false conclusions without any thinking further. In other words, we can have a better control with our thoughts and even form a more accurate judgment for ourselves. Chapter IV. “Paul Van Riper’s Big Victory: Creating Structure for Spontaneity”: In this chapter, the author discusses the case of Paul Van Riper, a commander in the Marine Corps within military philosophy. He explains how snap decisions wasn’t the best choice because its outcome is never certain. Often, Gladwell contends, the best decisions are...
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