Blake and Wordsworth

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Blake and Wordsworth

By | November 2008
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William Blake’s philosophy on growth and change was that when you are born, you are born into a state of innocence. As you grow up you realize that the world around you is not prefect and there are dark elements to it. Blake believed that everyone needed to remember the innocence of childhood and the truth and beauty that can be seen in the world. William Wordsworth believed that before we were born, we existed in a pure world, something like heaven perhaps and as we grow up we forget about this and stray farther from nature and our true selves. Children, to Wordsworth could find joy, meaning, and endless imaginative possibilities through nature. As we age although we may not experience the same joys from nature we need to remember our past experiences and draw on them for happiness and inspiration. Blake and Wordsworth both shared the similar idea that children view the world much different than adults, and that childhood is filled with simplicity, love, and joy. Blake and Wordsworth differ in respect to how they show the reader how to relate back to their childhood. Blake’s poems are filled with more religious symbolism than Wordsworth, whose poems focus more on spirituality through nature. Blake believed that children are close to God so therefore have an easier time dealing with injustices in the world. The state of innocence into which children are born is just the view they have of the world, they see honesty and splendor in most things. In Blake’s “The Lamb” the child tells us how we all were made by the lamb, who symbolizes Jesus, and how we are all connected through him. Blake shows us the ability of children to see past the evils of the world and realize that in the end if we do what is right, Jesus will save us.